Tim A
  • Tim A
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
08 November 2022 11:02:14

Originally Posted by: Jiries 


Same here when turn heat on and set at 19C so it hover often at 18.5 to 19C.  Did not put at 20 as it take longer to warm up from this current cool spell as it would take nearly 2 hours. By Thursday will set at 20C as first day of very mild weather coming to help heating boost then hope stay off for few days as long there sunshine to keep warm inside.


Combi boiler temps set at 65C for heating and 50C for hot water.


What about anyone of you set their boiler temps?


 



 


We have a combi boiler, hot water is set to 50c and heating at 60C.  Our gas engineer thinks 60c is best to maximise condensing effects, but online some recommend 75c so not sure which is best. 


Spent £20 on gas this month including hot water. Generally having heating on 2/3 times a day at the moment to try and maintain 18c when people are in the house sedentary for large periods. 


Gas usage for this week in November is less than half of that for the same week last year. 


We have three new radiators and 35m2 of new floor space in an extension which I am not heating yet as not quite decorated, will be interesting to see how much of a difference that makes.  


Tim
NW Leeds
187m asl

 My PWS 
ARTzeman
08 November 2022 13:28:13

A very wet day today, but inside it is 23.0c. In the lounge.






Some people walk in the rain.
Others just get wet.
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Jiries
08 November 2022 13:34:50

Originally Posted by: Tim A 


 


 


We have a combi boiler, hot water is set to 50c and heating at 60C.  Our gas engineer thinks 60c is best to maximise condensing effects, but online some recommend 75c so not sure which is best. 


Spent £20 on gas this month including hot water. Generally having heating on 2/3 times a day at the moment to try and maintain 18c when people are in the house sedentary for large periods. 


Gas usage for this week in November is less than half of that for the same week last year. 


We have three new radiators and 35m2 of new floor space in an extension which I am not heating yet as not quite decorated, will be interesting to see how much of a difference that makes.  



Same here £20 is way too much for 7 days and heating usage is 80% less than last year when I start putting on all day at 20C which usually give you around £1-2 a day.


To make up with already reached £20 will not use the heating when this mild weather arrive at 15-16C outside so hope it come with full sunshine.

DEW
  • DEW
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08 November 2022 13:46:32

Last Saturday''s Times was claiming that the average temp of a British house was 14C in the 1970s compared with 18C now, without giving any detail as to whether the whole house or just part of it was referred to.


War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
Chidog
08 November 2022 14:38:00

Originally Posted by: DEW 


Last Saturday''s Times was claiming that the average temp of a British house was 14C in the 1970s compared with 18C now, without giving any detail as to whether the whole house or just part of it was referred to.



The future is going to look more like the past with the advent of Smart TRVs. Our house is set to many different temperatures depending on room use on that day or time and automatically goes to frost preservation level if everyone is out, unless overridden.


Resultant expenditure on gas has been £42 in the last 10 days. Keeping the monthly bill under £250 during Dec-Feb would be more than acceptable I think

Tim A
  • Tim A
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
08 November 2022 16:07:06

Originally Posted by: Chidog 


 


The future is going to look more like the past with the advent of Smart TRVs. Our house is set to many different temperatures depending on room use on that day or time and automatically goes to frost preservation level if everyone is out, unless overridden.


Resultant expenditure on gas has been £42 in the last 10 days. Keeping the monthly bill under £250 during Dec-Feb would be more than acceptable I think



I am considering these but they are quite pricy.  I was thinking in particular for the bedrooms as there is rarely a need for the heating to come on in the mornings upstairs.  Also hope I could fit myself , but not sure how easy it will be. 


 


 


Tim
NW Leeds
187m asl

 My PWS 
DEW
  • DEW
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08 November 2022 16:25:37

Originally Posted by: Tim A 


 


I am considering these but they are quite pricy.  I was thinking in particular for the bedrooms as there is rarely a need for the heating to come on in the mornings upstairs.  Also hope I could fit myself , but not sure how easy it will be. 


 


Older 'dumb' TRVs e.g. https://www.victorianplumbing.co.uk/white-thermostatic-radiator-valve-15mm-angled-trv? are quite easy to fit and may suit? e.g. if in bedrooms, turn up when you/the kids get home, turn down when going to bed. 


War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
Tim A
  • Tim A
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
08 November 2022 16:27:47

Originally Posted by: DEW 


 


Older 'dumb' TRVs e.g. https://www.victorianplumbing.co.uk/white-thermostatic-radiator-valve-15mm-angled-trv? are quite easy to fit and may suit? e.g. if in bedrooms, turn up when you/the kids get home, turn down when going to bed. 



Yep I have those on all radiators and try and adjust when I remember.  Probably best to be disciplined and do some adjustments throughout the day rather than spend £45 per valve on a smart one. 


 


Tim
NW Leeds
187m asl

 My PWS 
Gusty
08 November 2022 17:53:56

Update.


Thermostat has been set to 16c overnight and 18c between 6am and 7pm for the past few days.


To be honest apart from the initial bit of a boost to get that starting temperature from around 17.2c up to 18c (and more importantly heating the towel rail) the heating is not really firing up. The radiators are still largely cold, energy usage remains impressively low.


 


Steve - Folkestone, Kent
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doctormog
08 November 2022 17:57:11
We’re up to 17 hours so far this month which is OK I guess but looking at smart meter monitor in passing is a bit depressing!
Retron
08 November 2022 18:03:39

Originally Posted by: doctormog 

We’re up to 17 hours so far this month which is OK I guess but looking at smart meter monitor in passing is a bit depressing!


20 hours' worth here, the thermostat being set to 16.5 most of the time (14 when I'm out).


As for temperatures, the plumbers set my boiler to 80 for heating and 60 for hot water, they said less than 60 gives the risk of legionnaire's.


(Looks like the HSE agrees. Setting it to 50 as some have done may not be the best idea!)


"Hot water should be stored at 60 °C at least in order to kill legionella bacteria. "


"Outgoing water should be at least 60 °C "


https://www.hse.gov.uk/legionnaires/things-to-consider.htm


 


Leysdown, north Kent
Tim A
  • Tim A
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
08 November 2022 18:07:49

Originally Posted by: Retron 


 


20 hours' worth here, the thermostat being set to 16.5 most of the time (14 when I'm out).


As for temperatures, the plumbers set my boiler to 80 for heating and 60 for hot water, they said less than 60 gives the risk of legionnaire's.


(Looks like the HSE agrees. Setting it to 50 as some have done may not be the best idea!)


"Hot water should be stored at 60 °C at least in order to kill legionella bacteria. "


"Outgoing water should be at least 60 °C "


https://www.hse.gov.uk/legionnaires/things-to-consider.htm


 



Think it is fine on a Combo boiler like mine as there is no water storage and the water is continually flushed through the boiler. Goes from say ,12c out of cold tap through the boiler straight to 50c and then is used.


Tim
NW Leeds
187m asl

 My PWS 
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
08 November 2022 19:09:36

Originally Posted by: Tim A 


 


Yep I have those on all radiators and try and adjust when I remember.  Probably best to be disciplined and do some adjustments throughout the day rather than spend £45 per valve on a smart one. 


 



It was a mistake looking them up to provide a link. My screen is now infested with ads for them -and not just TWO!


War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
doctormog
08 November 2022 19:15:23
I have thought about smart TRVs but I’m not sure I could justify them as I have “conventional” ones on all the radiators and it’s not that much hassle to change them if needed.
ARTzeman
09 November 2022 11:28:20

22.6. In the lounge this morning with the sunshine through the windows.






Some people walk in the rain.
Others just get wet.
I Just Blow my horn or trumpet
Rob K
09 November 2022 16:06:40

Originally Posted by: Chidog 


 


The future is going to look more like the past with the advent of Smart TRVs. Our house is set to many different temperatures depending on room use on that day or time and automatically goes to frost preservation level if everyone is out, unless overridden.


Resultant expenditure on gas has been £42 in the last 10 days. Keeping the monthly bill under £250 during Dec-Feb would be more than acceptable I think



With my ASHP and underfloor heating it is actually more efficient, I am told, to leave the heating on constantly in winter rather than making it turn on and off and heat up the slab.


The flow temperature for the floor heating varies depending on the outside temperature, up to a maximum of 50C in very cold weather, but generally should be in the 40-45C range which makes it pretty efficient.


 


Of course all this is hypothetical at the moment as it is still not working properly (awaiting an engineer who should have arrived this afternoon!). Having said that, when it has been running, our energy usage seems to be much lower than it was with the old heating system. In winter we would typically be using 50-60 units per day which would be somewhere like £20 a day at today's prices. I would hope we can cut that by more than half with the heat pump.


Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl
"But who wants to be foretold the weather? It is bad enough when it comes, without our having the misery of knowing about it beforehand." — Jerome K. Jerome
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
09 November 2022 17:31:01

Originally Posted by: Rob K 


 


With my ASHP and underfloor heating it is actually more efficient, I am told, to leave the heating on constantly in winter rather than making it turn on and off and heat up the slab.



I'm always dubious about the idea that leaving heating on constantly is more economical (which may be different from efficient) than letting the temperature cycle up and down. Newton's Law of Cooling* states that the rate of heat loss from an object is proportional to the difference in temperature between the object and its surroundings. So if you keep your house permanently at a higher temp, you will be spending more energy heating your surroundings than if the house is cooler at intervals. 


Your situation is complicated by the large thermal inertia of the slab. If you let that cool down, it will certainly take some time before you can use energy put into it to heat the rest of the house. So in that sense it may be more efficient, but I think the economy argument holds good overall.


I also dispute the effectiveness of leaving the oven door open after cooking to heat the rest of the house. The residue of heat residing in a hot oven is going to leak out into your house eventually. Leaving the door open just means that you get the heat out of it more quickly, and at a higher temperature. So, yes, an instant boost, which may be what you want, but no difference in the long run.


Better to capitalise on a nice sunny day, like today, which has raised the temp of my living room from 17.1C this morning to 20.6 now.


 


* an empirical law which applies at 'normal' temps where convection and conduction are dominant - Newton didn't have any extra-high temp sources so he wasn't able to experiment with radiative heat loss.


War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
Rob K
09 November 2022 18:04:41

Originally Posted by: Retron 


 


20 hours' worth here, the thermostat being set to 16.5 most of the time (14 when I'm out).


As for temperatures, the plumbers set my boiler to 80 for heating and 60 for hot water, they said less than 60 gives the risk of legionnaire's.


(Looks like the HSE agrees. Setting it to 50 as some have done may not be the best idea!)


"Hot water should be stored at 60 °C at least in order to kill legionella bacteria. "


"Outgoing water should be at least 60 °C "


https://www.hse.gov.uk/legionnaires/things-to-consider.htm


 



No need to keep it at 60 all the time though, that is much hotter than you need it. You just run a disinfection cycle.


The heat pump runs a legionnaires cycle once a week to boost the temperature up to 60-65C. Or it would do if it was working as it was supposed to!


 


PS @DEW that makes sense about a warmer house losing more heat, but apparently heat pumps are much more efficient if they can run at a low temperature for longer periods, rather than having to run at a higher temperature for shorter periods.


 


Eg if I set the leaving water temperature to 38C I could in theory get a COP of 5 or more (5 times more energy out than in) if the weather is relatively mild, but with the lower water temperature it would take a long time to heat the floor up. Whereas if I let the slab cool down then in order to get the temperature up I might need the water to be closer to 50C, which could cut the COP down to 3 or less.


Maybe once it is all working properly I will experiment with different approaches and see what works best in terms of comfort and cost.


Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl
"But who wants to be foretold the weather? It is bad enough when it comes, without our having the misery of knowing about it beforehand." — Jerome K. Jerome
Essan
09 November 2022 20:48:28

Originally Posted by: DEW 


Better to capitalise on a nice sunny day, like today, which has raised the temp of my living room from 17.1C this morning to 20.6 now.




Not everyone has a big house with south facing windows - so for some that is not an option 



(my mid terrace faces east-west so gets no solar warming at all in winter.  The advantage is that I've not had temps indoors of 21c+ for weeks now,    



Currently a quite pleasant (asuming you are not a reptilian nudist) 16.8c*


* obviously no heating on 


Andy
Evesham, Worcs, Albion - 35m asl
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ARTzeman
09 November 2022 21:41:35
Thermostat switched off and comes on again in the morning if below 21.0c. Reading 22.0c at the moment.




Some people walk in the rain.
Others just get wet.
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