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Offline Bertwhistle  
#661 Posted : 24 May 2020 09:36:25(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,328
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Rob K Go to Quoted Post
Surgery time!
One of my two cucumber seedlings snapped partway up the main stem. It’s still attached but the hollow stem has pinched flat and won’t stay upright. Following a bit of advice online I have taped the stem to a wooden “splint” and replanted the seedling in a deeper pot so the break is below the soil, in the hope that it will send out roots from higher up. It snapped yesterday and still seems green and plump today, so fingers crossed it will repair itself.

I reckon that's the right thing to do. Tomatoes, sayeth Monty, should always be planted deep as it encourages stronger rooting and lower shooting- could be the same for cucumbers.

After gloating about our courgettes, two have now got major snaps from yesterday's wind.

Dry weather has meant almost no slugs and snails out but we're getting an increasing greenfly problem, especially on lettuces and weaker tomatoes. Having to top&tail wash every lettuce leaf before consuming. They don't seem so keen on the rocket.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Rob K  
#662 Posted : 25 May 2020 08:24:42(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 22,388
Location: Northeast Hampshire

Well the cucumber is still looking healthy and another new leaf is appearing from the centre so it seems to have worked so far. Amazing that the water can still get through once the stem has collapsed like that.

I’m also enjoying the lack of slugs and snails. No greenfly yet on our lettuces. Our big rose bush is once again covered in mildew as it seems to every year, especially when it is dry, but it never seems to stop the display of flowers. Not sure what variety it is but it’s very vigorous and fills one whole corner of the garden. Some type of musk rose I think, with cream flowers that fade to white. It looks fantastic but the flowering period only lasts for two or three weeks from around late May to mid June, depending on weather.  

Edited by user 25 May 2020 08:27:54(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Offline Saint Snow  
#663 Posted : 27 May 2020 21:05:17(UTC)
Saint Snow

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Posts: 47,692
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Location: St Helens

Should the bottom layers of my compost bin be riddled with ants and wood lice?

 

 

"Poverty exists not because we cannot feed the poor, but because we cannot satisfy the rich."

Martin

Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)

A TWO addict since 14/12/01

Offline Rob K  
#664 Posted : 27 May 2020 21:50:33(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 22,388
Location: Northeast Hampshire

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow Go to Quoted Post

Should the bottom layers of my compost bin be riddled with ants and wood lice?

 

 

Sounds like it's too dry? Mine is just riddled with worms, dozens of them in every spadefull.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Offline NMA  
#665 Posted : 28 May 2020 07:23:39(UTC)
NMA

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Location: South Dorset

Originally Posted by: Rob K Go to Quoted Post

 Sounds like it's too dry? Mine is just riddled with worms, dozens of them in every spadefull.

Robs compost sounds like it's going well. Add a couple of cans of water Saint and keep it moist but not overly so.

An accelerator helps as well.

Online Roger Parsons  
#666 Posted : 28 May 2020 08:19:53(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

Robs compost sounds like it's going well. Add a couple of cans of water Saint and keep it moist but not overly so.

An accelerator helps as well.

For a free accelerator, Saint, you can do no better than "chamber lees" as they called it in Lincolnshire. Best diluted. Main thing is as said - to get the heap wet - but not too wet. You don't want "anaerobic" conditions.

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline NMA  
#667 Posted : 28 May 2020 09:05:55(UTC)
NMA

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,545
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Location: South Dorset

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 For a free accelerator, Saint, you can do no better than "chamber lees" as they called it in Lincolnshire. Best diluted. Main thing is as said - to get the heap wet - but not too wet. You don't want "anaerobic" conditions.

R.

Indeed Roger. I suggested he uses that very same compound I think last year. It's also a great tomato feed too, diluted of course.

Good for lawns or indeed most horticultural endeavours.

Edited by user 28 May 2020 09:07:07(UTC)  | Reason: too many too's or something like that.

Online Roger Parsons  
#668 Posted : 28 May 2020 09:15:17(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

Indeed Roger. I suggested he uses that very same compound I think last year. It's also a great tomato feed too, diluted of course.

Good for lawns or indeed most horticultural endeavours.

When I was a kid, in the days before inside toilets and central heating - a piss pot or gozunder was found in most bedrooms. You could tell my Gran was in the privy by the fag smoke coming out of the little "window" in the door. Wee went on the garden - why not?

In these lockdown days of closed public toilets I find myself yearning for the absence of "pissoirs" - but that's a typical selfish male thought...

The excellent one near Radio Lincolnshire in Lincoln has been closed for some time. How mean! Here's the Twickenham Pissoir. Luxury! Enjoy.

https://londonist.com/london/secret/london-s-most-glorious-toilets-the-twickenham-urinal-pissoir

Roger

 p.s. I was using one of these in Rome some years ago when a classy lady came in, stood next to me, gathered up her long dress and had a perfectly successful wee, as far as I could judge from a distance. I was a bit surprised and still can't answer the obvious question...

 

 

Edited by user 28 May 2020 14:58:46(UTC)  | Reason: addition + typo

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline bledur  
#669 Posted : 29 May 2020 19:36:22(UTC)
bledur

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Location: WEST HANTS

Pee is also a way of clearing up Fungal nail infection so every time you have a shower piss on your afflicted toe.

Offline Caz  
#670 Posted : 29 May 2020 19:58:45(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,687
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Rob K Go to Quoted Post

Sounds like it's too dry? Mine is just riddled with worms, dozens of them in every spadefull.

That sounds perfect compost!

We’ve temporarily removed our compost bin due to the woodshed relocation and my son is missing it!  All his life he’s used it as his ‘loo’, he’s 31 now!   Nothing better for getting your compost working than pee!

My runner beans are 4foot high with flower buds, my tumbling toms have flower buds and my courgette is finally having a growth spurt but my dwarf French beans are not doing a lot.  I’ve planted out my competition sunflowers over buckets full of compost in the sunniest part of the garden, away from any veg plants as I’ve read they send out toxins to keep the ground around them clear.  Fingers are crossed as I have tough opposition.  My kids and my siblings!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

Join the fun and banter of the monthly CET competition. Discuss monthly temperatures and records.

Offline DEW  
#671 Posted : 30 May 2020 08:31:43(UTC)
DEW

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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Picking up from the UIA virus thread on hosepipe bans (which would seem to belong here)

The lawns here have noticeably gone brown in last week, and even some street trees are showing signs of stress.

I'm surprised that water suppliers in the SE are worried, as most of the water for this region is from underground supplies. The level of  local well at Chilgrove is about average for the time of year and the Lavant winterbourne is still running though declining.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline Bertwhistle  
#672 Posted : 30 May 2020 10:45:42(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,328
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Picking up from the UIA virus thread on hosepipe bans (which would seem to belong here)

The lawns here have noticeably gone brown in last week, and even some street trees are showing signs of stress.

I'm surprised that water suppliers in the SE are worried, as most of the water for this region is from underground supplies. The level of  local well at Chilgrove is about average for the time of year and the Lavant winterbourne is still running though declining.

Yes, the aquifers have been thoroughly well-charged and although soil moisture is low just beneath the surface and the lawn is yellowing, everything deep rooted including the fruit trees seems fine here.

An additional horticultural stress might be temperatures if some of the long fetch cold air in the models settles in for a few nights, with HP reasserting, dropping the winds and drying the air. Frost pockets to the midlands and ground frosts possible here. I thought I'd tucked the fleeces away for the year after that late cold spell in May!

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Rob K  
#673 Posted : 30 May 2020 14:41:17(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 22,388
Location: Northeast Hampshire

Yes I’m hoping there won’t be any more frost now everything is racing I to growth.

Courgettes and squashes are thriving now although still only male flowers so far, two or three weeks after the first flowers appeared.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Offline Caz  
#674 Posted : 30 May 2020 20:32:41(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,687
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

I think the warning about water usage was because demand is so high, rather than supply being low.  Severn Trent were saying our pressure may drop due to demand with people being at home.  I expect everyone’s gardening and I have to admit to putting the sprinkler on our yellowing lawns. 

My runner beans are now showing red flowers!  Yay!  Thank you weather gods but please don’t send frosts to spoil all your good work!  

 

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

Join the fun and banter of the monthly CET competition. Discuss monthly temperatures and records.

Offline DEW  
#675 Posted : 31 May 2020 06:12:21(UTC)
DEW

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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

I think the warning about water usage was because demand is so high, rather than supply being low.   

I spent some time on the phone trying to persuade my wife's nephew in London not to throw out 5000 gallons of water from his inflatable pool because the latest batch of chlorinating chemicals had deposited a bit of sediment (which IMO will be sucked up by the filtration system - and certainly ought to be given the chance to do so overnight). He uses the pool for exercise, swimming like mad but with a rope tied round his waist to prevent him going anywhere.

Down here, I've put in the bedding plants from seed (cosmos, antirrhinum etc). Not the ideal weather for planting out, first hot then cold, and I shall have to keep them well watered, but they were really getting too large for the seed trays.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline DEW  
#676 Posted : 31 May 2020 06:15:37(UTC)
DEW

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 14,180
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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

 

Yes, the aquifers have been thoroughly well-charged and although soil moisture is low just beneath the surface and the lawn is yellowing, everything deep rooted including the fruit trees seems fine here.

Some herbaceous stuff e.g. hollyhocks looking very wilted during the day but recovering overnight. I suppose the roots just ca't pump the water fast enough.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline Rob K  
#677 Posted : 31 May 2020 07:16:44(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 22,388
Location: Northeast Hampshire

First female courgette flowers spotted - they must have been listening!

And the snapped cucumber seedling is making good progress - having been reburied with its splint it is shooting up.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Online Roger Parsons  
#678 Posted : 31 May 2020 07:29:23(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,507
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

I have often been asked why some plants of this family [Cucurbitaceae], including Pumpkins, don't seem to attract many honeybees for pollination. A very experience beekeeper and gardener told me they do attract insects, but often quite early in the morning, so people don't get to see them. The nectar flow seemed to him to be aimed at night-flyers and early-risers like bumblebees. You might keep an eye out if you get up early. Two useful links below re courgettes and pumpkins.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/grand-challenges-food-for-thought/0/steps/52752


https://www.apicultural.co.uk/the-bees-that-pollinate-pumpkins



Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Northern Sky  
#679 Posted : 31 May 2020 09:25:31(UTC)
Northern Sky

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 16/08/2010(UTC)
Posts: 5,428
Location: Leeds W Yorks

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

 

My runner beans are now showing red flowers!  Yay!  Thank you weather gods but please don’t send frosts to spoil all your good work!  

 

I've tried some dwarf runner beans both last year and this and though they were covered in flowers last year there were hardly any beans. The ones I've tried this year seem to be doing the same - flowering but not producing anything. I think I'm going to sow a few normal runners today and give up on the dwarf variety.

Offline Rob K  
#680 Posted : 31 May 2020 20:26:14(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 22,388
Location: Northeast Hampshire

Had some of the first radishes with my lunch today. A lot hotter and more peppery than the ones from Tesco!

Salad is doing really well too and we’ve been harvesting for a week or so now. The lack of rain and therefore of slugs is most welcome.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
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