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Online ARTzeman  
#521 Posted : 01 May 2019 13:41:07(UTC)
ARTzeman

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Joined: 14/07/2012(UTC)
Posts: 25,755
Man
Location: Peasedown St John. N.E. Sommerset

Fuscia in the growing has buds and flowers. Have nipped the tops out now to make them bushy. Wild strawberries in an earthenware tub have buds and flowers. I only pull off dead leaves and let them get on with it. Wild pale reddish poppies sawn last year have done well and are also in the bud.



Some people walk in the rain.
Others just get wet.
Online Saint Snow  
#522 Posted : 14 May 2019 11:49:56(UTC)
Saint Snow

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 43,265
Man
Location: St Helens

I've dug up my lawn, leveled it, topped with 4 ton of grit sand and an anti-weed emdbrance, and will be fitting 80m2 of artificial grass at the weekend.


Been a mammoth job, but I was sick of the sight of a patchy, moss-laden field of dandelions.


 

Trump on Jeffrey Epstein:
"I’ve known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy. He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it — Jeffrey enjoys his social life."

Martin
Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)
A TWO addict since 14/12/01
Online ARTzeman  
#523 Posted : 18 May 2019 10:39:36(UTC)
ARTzeman

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/07/2012(UTC)
Posts: 25,755
Man
Location: Peasedown St John. N.E. Sommerset

In one growing room, Parsley. TWO pots  Common garden mint and a Kalanchoe.


In number TWO growing room, 6 Fuchsia, 6 geraniums. TWO apricot trees only Two years old. Runner beans in pots soon to be transplanted. Also   Tomato plants.  Baby potatoes need to go in the big tubs.   



Some people walk in the rain.
Others just get wet.
Offline NMA  
#524 Posted : 23 May 2019 13:33:09(UTC)
NMA

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 1,898
Man
Location: South Dorset

David said on the Model thread:


Charts for the South this morning offer no significant rain for the foreseeable future - GFS pressure forecast doesn't drop below 1015 mb for the next two weeks, and when it does dip towards that it's the tail end of depressions passing across the north, not a thundery low from France. GEFS rainfall comes in spikes suggesting local showers. Scots must wonder what we're complaining about!


Warm air comes and goes - a bit of a dip in temp around the 29th/30th - but in general not far from average.


Gave a deep watering to parts of the garden earlier today as the recent showery rain didn't do much.


Not too bothered with lawn as it will of course recover but it is showing the beginning of browning in places. The Green out front is not growing much if at all after a parish council cut a week ago.

Offline Bertwhistle  
#525 Posted : 23 May 2019 16:18:02(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,673
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow Go to Quoted Post


I've dug up my lawn, leveled it, topped with 4 ton of grit sand and an anti-weed emdbrance, and will be fitting 80m2 of artificial grass at the weekend.


Been a mammoth job, but I was sick of the sight of a patchy, moss-laden field of dandelions.


 



Yeah- who needs bee-food?

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Offline Bertwhistle  
#526 Posted : 23 May 2019 16:20:56(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,673
Location: Central Southern England

Have harvested some single-bulb garlic and potatoes, and a mountain of different herbs: winter savoury and English mace are worth a try!


Peas have set, runners climbing well, and the garden is full of bees, hoverflies and (around the pond) damselflies.


Bought metres of false lawn for daughter's quirky bedroom fad ('the garden bedroom'); she rejected it and I can't refund it as I cut it to size. Free to good home (collect!)

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Offline Roger Parsons  
#527 Posted : 31 May 2019 05:06:53(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Anyone in need of a change of job? How about this one?
St Michael's Mount: 'Fairytale' island needs new gardener
https://www.bbc.co.uk/ne...ngland-cornwall-48464266

Roger
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Offline Roger Parsons  
#528 Posted : 05 June 2019 07:51:45(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,097
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Elderflower cordial - we picked elderflowers at the weekend and cordial manufacture is underway. If you do this, don't forget that diluted cordial makes unbelievably good ice lollies! I see the other half has the moulds out, ready to fill.

A recipe
https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/531660/homemade-elderflower-cordial




Roger


p.s. we have an elderflower tree in the garden - or to be exact a branch from the neighbour - so this is NOT off topic!!!

Edited by user 05 June 2019 08:15:07(UTC)  | Reason: addition

RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Online Justin W  
#529 Posted : 05 June 2019 08:26:29(UTC)
Justin W

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/06/2006(UTC)
Posts: 13,096
Location: North Downs, East Kent

We've got a small orchard (about a third of an acre) which we have managed as perennial meadow for the last 10 years. When we came here 14 years ago, it had only recently been abandoned as a vegetable garden and so the soil is very fertile. As a result, for much of the past decade, it's been dominated by thick grasses, hogweed, creeping buttercup, etc.


We debated stripping the topsoil off but instead decided to manage it traditionally - cutting it as hay late in the summer then doing a close cut once in the autumn and once early in the spring.


Three years ago, we saw that three bee orchids were growing. Last year, there were four. This year, there are more than 50 flowering. I will post pictures later but it really is quite something. 

Offline Roger Parsons  
#530 Posted : 05 June 2019 08:33:27(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,097
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Justin W Go to Quoted Post


We've got a small orchard (about a third of an acre) which we have managed as perennial meadow for the last 10 years. When we came here 14 years ago, it had only recently been abandoned as a vegetable garden and so the soil is very fertile. As a result, for much of the past decade, it's been dominated by thick grasses, hogweed, creeping buttercup, etc.


We debated stripping the topsoil off but instead decided to manage it traditionally - cutting it as hay late in the summer then doing a close cut once in the autumn and once early in the spring.


Three years ago, we saw that three bee orchids were growing. Last year, there were four. This year, there are more than 50 flowering. I will post pictures later but it really is quite something. 



That is really excellent, Justin. It is amazing what will start growing if you get the management right. The trick is to lower the fertility - which is easier to say than do in your situation.


Are you using Yellow Rattle to counteract the vigorous grasses? Worth looking into. One chap I've met swears the way to deal with hogweed is to scythe it, leaving the hollow stem to gather water and rot out the root.


Roger


 

RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Online Justin W  
#531 Posted : 05 June 2019 08:47:08(UTC)
Justin W

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/06/2006(UTC)
Posts: 13,096
Location: North Downs, East Kent

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post


 


That is really excellent, Justin. It is amazing what will start growing if you get the management right. The trick is to lower the fertility - which is easier to say than do in your situation.


Are you using Yellow Rattle to counteract the vigorous grasses? Worth looking into. One chap I've met swears the way to deal with hogweed is to scythe it, leaving the hollow stem to gather water and rot out the root.


Roger


 



We have Yellow Rattle seed and may sow it on disturbed soil in the orchard at the end of the summer. To date, all we've done is just cut and remove the growth to reduce fertility (allowing a couple of days for the hay to lie to sow seed). It's been an interesting experiment in light touch meadow management. We were absolutely amazed when the orchids first flowered, wondering where they had come from and how they had been brought here.


Interesting approach on hogweed - of course we need rain to rot out the stem and root. And we have had precious little of that over the last three summers!

Online xioni2  
#532 Posted : 05 June 2019 18:21:10(UTC)
xioni2

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 08/04/2010(UTC)
Posts: 6,818
Location: London

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow Go to Quoted Post


I've dug up my lawn, leveled it, topped with 4 ton of grit sand and an anti-weed emdbrance, and will be fitting 80m2 of artificial grass at the weekend.


Been a mammoth job, but I was sick of the sight of a patchy, moss-laden field of dandelions.


 


Why didn't you rewild your garden and then start running through it, a bit like Theresa May?


 

Let's do it, let's jump!
Offline Bertwhistle  
#533 Posted : 05 June 2019 20:55:45(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,673
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Justin W Go to Quoted Post


We've got a small orchard (about a third of an acre) which we have managed as perennial meadow for the last 10 years. When we came here 14 years ago, it had only recently been abandoned as a vegetable garden and so the soil is very fertile. As a result, for much of the past decade, it's been dominated by thick grasses, hogweed, creeping buttercup, etc.


We debated stripping the topsoil off but instead decided to manage it traditionally - cutting it as hay late in the summer then doing a close cut once in the autumn and once early in the spring.


Three years ago, we saw that three bee orchids were growing. Last year, there were four. This year, there are more than 50 flowering. I will post pictures later but it really is quite something. 



I'm thrilled to hear this Justin. I can't add to that! 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Offline Bertwhistle  
#534 Posted : 05 June 2019 20:57:29(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,673
Location: Central Southern England

Harvest the hogweed early, chaps; makes a passable asparagus replacement that doesn't smell in your pee!

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Online DEW  
#535 Posted : 06 June 2019 06:05:58(UTC)
DEW

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 12,147
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post


Harvest the hogweed early, chaps; makes a passable asparagus replacement that doesn't smell in your pee!



Oo-er! I know it's officially edible but I'm not sure I want to try with the photo-blisters the sap raises on my skin (No, I don't mean giant hogweed which is reputedly much worse)

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline Roger Parsons  
#536 Posted : 08 June 2019 14:53:55(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,097
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Set up the trail camera last night hoping to confirm a hedghog visit and instead caught a fox tripping through the garden!
Not uncommon, I know, but a nice surprise. R


 


p.s. Got the hedgehog on camera this week - and its poo in the garden as additional evidence.


R

Edited by user 16 June 2019 20:46:37(UTC)  | Reason: + smiley

RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Offline Roger Parsons  
#537 Posted : 16 June 2019 20:44:24(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,097
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Is anyone here an invertebrate specialist? I have been sent a video of some organisms from the water in a teazel rosette. The photographer describes them as: "Some sort of nematodes, wriggling around in the water-filled bowl formed by teasel leaf rosettes. How they got there is unknown. Maybe they were living as parasites within the insects that drowned in the water. Proto-carnivorous, the teasel apparently doesn't have an enzyme to dissolve the insects, but, I have read, that the resultant 'soup' is utilised by the plant to enhance seed production." Comments welcome. I'll post the vid if anyone is interested.
Roger
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Online DEW  
#538 Posted : 17 June 2019 06:16:56(UTC)
DEW

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 12,147
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline Roger Parsons  
#539 Posted : 17 June 2019 06:40:33(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,097
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post


It certainly does, DEW - many thanks for that. The video illustrated the key points rather well. See below...


Roger


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCfVgwPvc-g&feature=youtu.be


 

RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".
Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)
Online DEW  
#540 Posted : 17 June 2019 06:48:31(UTC)
DEW

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 12,147
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Also, while ferreting around, found this on fly pollination.


http://urbanpollinators.blogspot.com/2014/03/flies-forgotten-pollinators.html


A good read, but watch out for the typos - crap apples anyone?

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
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