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Chunky Pea
29 May 2024 18:49:48
The rate of flow inside of the berns near grindivk is incredible. Those manmade walls are holding up well. 
Current Conditions
https://t.ly/MEYqg 


"You don't have to know anything to have an opinion"
--Roger P, 12/Oct/2022
Roger Parsons
20 June 2024 08:56:49

The rate of flow inside of the berns near grindivk is incredible. Those manmade walls are holding up well. 

Originally Posted by: Chunky Pea 

We don't seen to be using this thread - but there's quite a bit of activity doing on, so here goes:
BBC Volcanoes page:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/c340r9zgpnkt 
Volcano Updates - USGS
https://www.usgs.gov/programs/VHP/volcano-updates 
Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
https://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm 


 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
05 July 2024 07:40:49
Watch: Mount Etna spits lava into the night sky - 4th July 2024
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/videos/cw0yjgwzldyo 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
StoneCroze
12 July 2024 12:11:46
I'm too lazy to look it up myself, but does anybody on here know if the Italian volcanoes are interconnected?
Alderney, Channel Islands. (previously known as Beaufort)
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
12 July 2024 22:39:56

I'm too lazy to look it up myself, but does anybody on here know if the Italian volcanoes are interconnected?

Originally Posted by: StoneCroze 


AFAIK Etna and Stromboli draw from the same magma reservoir though not directly connected. The reservoir is a low-silica basaltic type, h=which flows easily and typically gives a sequence of frequent but not especially violent eruptions, often descried as Strombolian. Stromboli has been in more or less continuous eruption for the last 5000 years. 

The contrasting type of eruption is Plinian, after Pliny the Younger's description of the eruption of Vesuvius which buried Pompeii. Plinian eruptions are sourced by rhyolite, a high-silica viscous magma, which tends to stick until the pressure is too great, and then it goes bang! Etna does this in a small way occasionally, but Vesuvius is exclusively Plinian; so presumably a different part of any magma reservoir even if it's all driven by the movement of the African plate and the Italian microplate against Europe.

The really alarming one is the Campi Flegrei caldera, a supervolcano underlying much of Naples which could blow any time, and has been producing rises and falls of several metres of ground level recently. When this blew about 40,000 years ago, the volume of ash ejected is conservatively estimated at 36 cubic miles (yes, the units are correct, and that's one of the lower estimates) and is thought to have wiped out early human and Neanderthal populations of Europe. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlegraean_Fields
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Chichester 12m asl
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