Roger Parsons
24 March 2024 15:57:38
The Moon will probably spoil tonight's sky watching but you might get lucky.
See AuroraWatch Red Alert:
https://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/ 
 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Bolty
24 March 2024 16:23:41
Apparently it's one of the strongest geomagnetic storms in about 20 years, I've heard. Let's just hope the front doesn't move in too quickly and the activity lasts until after dark. As Roger said though, there's a full moon tonight, so that may put a dampener on it.
Scott
Blackrod, Lancashire (4 miles south of Chorley) at 156m asl.
My weather station 
Roger Parsons
24 March 2024 17:45:25
Cloud too here, I suspect. 😟
See:
https://spaceweather.com/ 
 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
24 March 2024 23:46:15
I think it missed us!
https://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/ 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
04 April 2024 06:12:38
"Devil comet" 12P/Pons-Brooks: I'll be interested if anyone gets a photo. 😁
"Amateur astronomers are reporting naked-eye sightings of "devil comet" 12P/Pons-Brooks in the evening sky. The 4th magnitude comet is brightening as it approaches the sun for a close encounter later this month. It will be an easy target for night-sky cameras this week, and maybe even during the total solar eclipse on April 8."
https://spaceweather.com/ 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
04 April 2024 06:14:45
How can I watch the Total Solar Eclipse online on April 8th 2024?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MJY_ptQW1o 

Solar eclipse 2024: Millions in North America will view what promises to be a blockbuster
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-68597945 
 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
06 April 2024 06:54:54
Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons 

How can I watch the Total Solar Eclipse online on April 8th 2024?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MJY_ptQW1o 

Solar eclipse 2024: Millions in North America will view what promises to be a blockbuster
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-68597945 
 



Where to watch in Britain and for how long:
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-68731785 
CP may get half-an-hour's worth but the forecast is for cloud and rain. The English can ignore it anyway.
War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
Roger Parsons
07 April 2024 15:10:14
Eclipse fever is building. Millions in North America are hoping to spend around four minutes in total darkness as the Moon blocks the Sun's light on Monday.
Total solar eclipse: The 4-minute window into the Sun's secrets
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-68742516 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
08 April 2024 00:38:46
Eclipse 2024 live: Watch the full NASA broadcast – latest
The eclipse is about to begin. Totality will arrive at Mexico’s west coast around 11.07am local time, moving east until it leaves Newfoundland, Canada, around 5.16pm there

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2425343-eclipse-2024-live-watch-the-full-nasa-broadcast-latest/ 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
08 April 2024 16:31:28
NASA Feed starts in about 30  minutes, I think.
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Chunky Pea
08 April 2024 18:49:04
Totality right over Dallas right now.
 
Current Conditions
https://t.ly/MEYqg 


"You don't have to know anything to have an opinion"
--Roger P, 12/Oct/2022
johncs2016
08 April 2024 19:01:01
I'm currently watching it on timeanddate.com's Facebook livestream and it all looks really spectacular there.

As totality moves across each location which then temporarily becomes quite dark as a result, it has been interesting to notice the effect on that area's weather, especially as regards to the temperature.

In one such location, the temperature dropped from around 32°C to around 25°C as they were going into totality and I would then expect the temperature to just as quickly go back up again once totality ended with the Sun then re-appearing.
The north of Edinburgh, usually always missing out on snow events which occur not just within the rest of Scotland or the UK, but also within the rest of Edinburgh.
Roger Parsons
11 April 2024 13:03:56
The Lyrid meteor shower will peak between 22 and 23 April, although meteors might be spotted across the whole second half of the month, between 14 and 30 April.
https://www.rmg.co.uk/stories/topics/lyrid-meteor-shower-when-where-see-it-uk 
https://www.rmg.co.uk/stories/blog/astronomy/night-sky-highlights-april-2024 
 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Retron
11 April 2024 13:15:08
Originally Posted by: johncs2016 


In one such location, the temperature dropped from around 32°C to around 25°C as they were going into totality and I would then expect the temperature to just as quickly go back up again once totality ended with the Sun then re-appearing.


I remember back on the 11th August 1999, when there was a 97% eclipse here (and total in Cornwall), it became very still, all the birds stopped their chirping and there was just a slight "nip in the air" feeling as the maximum was reached... the light started to fade, too, but it was oh so brief.

(I found out then that it takes at least 95% of the sun to vanish before you start to think "oh, it's getting dark"... shows just how bright it is!)

EDIT: Coincidentally, there's a 91% eclipse on the 12th August 2026. And unlike the 1999 one, it'll be around 90% or more over Scotland too! SW Ireland will see the greatest cover nearby, at 98% - you'll have to go to northern Spain or Portugal if you want to see totality. And if you want to go there, you'll probably need to book this summer!
Leysdown, north Kent
Roger Parsons
11 April 2024 13:32:03
Originally Posted by: Retron 

I remember back on the 11th August 1999, when there was a 97% eclipse here (and total in Cornwall), it became very still, all the birds stopped their chirping and there was just a slight "nip in the air" feeling as the maximum was reached... the light started to fade, too, but it was oh so brief.

(I found out then that it takes at least 95% of the sun to vanish before you start to think "oh, it's getting dark"... shows just how bright it is!)

EDIT: Coincidentally, there's a 91% eclipse on the 12th August 2026. And unlike the 1999 one, it'll be around 90% or more over Scotland too! SW Ireland will see the greatest cover nearby, at 98% - you'll have to go to northern Spain or Portugal if you want to see totality. And if you want to go there, you'll probably need to book this summer!

The 1999 eclipse coincided with my being in hospital with a suspected MI - but I was able to persuade them to discharge me in time to watch it. 😱 One of our most memorable eclipses was in West Africa in the early 80s. We had a climbing vine on a trellis in the garden, for shade - and every gap in the leaves projected a "pin hole camera" image of the crescent sun covering everything in the images. Like something out of Comet in Moominland! ☄☄☄
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_in_Moominland 
 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Retron
11 April 2024 14:02:16
Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons 

every gap in the leaves projected a "pin hole camera" image of the crescent sun covering everything in the images. Like something out of Comet in Moominland! ☄☄☄
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_in_Moominland 
 


When I was much younger, my dad produced a very musty set of books called "World of the Children ", dating form 1948 - I think they were his when he was a child. It was an encyclopedia but written as a long story rather than a series of articles, and one of the stories covered an eclipse - the children were amazed to see that the dappled spots of sunlight under a tree became little crescents during the eclipse.

Remembering this, I made sure to check during the 1999 eclipse - and, of course, it was spot on. I just wish I'd had a digital camera to capture it, but there'll be a good opportunity in just over 2 years' time.

(I also suggested years later, when I was working in the school and a partial eclipse was due, that the science teachers might want to take the kids outside to see the effect for themselves. To my surprise, they actually did (I don't think they'd thought of it, but realised it would be a good lesson!)
Leysdown, north Kent
Windy Willow
11 April 2024 14:44:46
I am confirming the Crescent shapes during the 1999 eclipse, as I noticed those too whilst in the back garden with a pierced piece of card to show my, then, very young children but noticed the crescents on the ground from the neighbours tree shadow too. It was pretty cool. My mum was in Falmouth at the time, staying with my gran so got to experience totality.
Pretty much experienced all that has already been described by others here.
119.4 m /391.7 feet asl
Sunny Dartford, NW Kent

Don't feed the Trolls!! When starved of attention they return to their dark caves or the dark recesses of bridges and will turn back to stone, silent again!
Bolty
12 April 2024 15:16:45
Probably the most spectacular wedding photo someone could ever have! Hope that's a marriage that lasts! 😮

https://www.facebook.com/share/p/MaoLtNErCCWzyU5H/ 
Scott
Blackrod, Lancashire (4 miles south of Chorley) at 156m asl.
My weather station 
Roger Parsons
12 April 2024 15:21:26
Originally Posted by: Bolty 

Probably the most spectacular wedding photo someone could ever have! Hope that's a marriage that lasts! 😮

https://www.facebook.com/share/p/MaoLtNErCCWzyU5H/ 


"There once was a girl from Detroit
Who at kissing was very adroit,
She could pucker her lips
Into total eclipse,
Or open them out like a quoit!
😲
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Saint Snow
12 April 2024 15:29:48
Originally Posted by: Retron 

I remember back on the 11th August 1999, when there was a 97% eclipse here (and total in Cornwall), it became very still, all the birds stopped their chirping and there was just a slight "nip in the air" feeling as the maximum was reached... the light started to fade, too, but it was oh so brief.

(I found out then that it takes at least 95% of the sun to vanish before you start to think "oh, it's getting dark"... shows just how bright it is!)

EDIT: Coincidentally, there's a 91% eclipse on the 12th August 2026. And unlike the 1999 one, it'll be around 90% or more over Scotland too! SW Ireland will see the greatest cover nearby, at 98% - you'll have to go to northern Spain or Portugal if you want to see totality. And if you want to go there, you'll probably need to book this summer!




I was on the roof of the tax office (where I worked at the time) for the 1999 eclipse.

I most remember the light turning 'odd'.

 

Martin
Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)
A TWO addict since 14/12/01
"How can wealth persuade poverty to use its political freedom to keep wealth in power? Here lies the whole art of Conservative politics."
Aneurin Bevan
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