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Chunky Pea
29 May 2024 18:49:48
The rate of flow inside of the berns near grindivk is incredible. Those manmade walls are holding up well. 
Current Conditions
https://t.ly/MEYqg 


"You don't have to know anything to have an opinion"
--Roger P, 12/Oct/2022
Roger Parsons
20 June 2024 08:56:49

The rate of flow inside of the berns near grindivk is incredible. Those manmade walls are holding up well. 

Originally Posted by: Chunky Pea 

We don't seen to be using this thread - but there's quite a bit of activity doing on, so here goes:
BBC Volcanoes page:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/c340r9zgpnkt 
Volcano Updates - USGS
https://www.usgs.gov/programs/VHP/volcano-updates 
Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
https://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm 


 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
Roger Parsons
05 July 2024 07:40:49
Watch: Mount Etna spits lava into the night sky - 4th July 2024
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/videos/cw0yjgwzldyo 
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
StoneCroze
12 July 2024 12:11:46
I'm too lazy to look it up myself, but does anybody on here know if the Italian volcanoes are interconnected?
Alderney, Channel Islands. (previously known as Beaufort)
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
12 July 2024 22:39:56

I'm too lazy to look it up myself, but does anybody on here know if the Italian volcanoes are interconnected?

Originally Posted by: StoneCroze 


AFAIK Etna and Stromboli draw from the same magma reservoir though not directly connected. The reservoir is a low-silica basaltic type, h=which flows easily and typically gives a sequence of frequent but not especially violent eruptions, often descried as Strombolian. Stromboli has been in more or less continuous eruption for the last 5000 years. 

The contrasting type of eruption is Plinian, after Pliny the Younger's description of the eruption of Vesuvius which buried Pompeii. Plinian eruptions are sourced by rhyolite, a high-silica viscous magma, which tends to stick until the pressure is too great, and then it goes bang! Etna does this in a small way occasionally, but Vesuvius is exclusively Plinian; so presumably a different part of any magma reservoir even if it's all driven by the movement of the African plate and the Italian microplate against Europe.

The really alarming one is the Campi Flegrei caldera, a supervolcano underlying much of Naples which could blow any time, and has been producing rises and falls of several metres of ground level recently. When this blew about 40,000 years ago, the volume of ash ejected is conservatively estimated at 36 cubic miles (yes, the units are correct, and that's one of the lower estimates) and is thought to have wiped out early human and Neanderthal populations of Europe. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlegraean_Fields
War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
Roger Parsons
13 July 2024 05:22:17
Excellent post - thanks David.
RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
StoneCroze
13 July 2024 06:03:33
I agree, very interesting. One of those geographical features which has been a constant all my life. Etna usually features on the news at some point during the year.
I know a little about the Hawaii island chain and they were/are formed by magma coming up as the tectonic plate moves over a magma chamber hot spot.
Alderney, Channel Islands. (previously known as Beaufort)
NMA
  • NMA
  • Advanced Member
13 July 2024 07:18:34

I agree, very interesting. One of those geographical features which has been a constant all my life. Etna usually features on the news at some point during the year.
I know a little about the Hawaii island chain and they were/are formed by magma coming up as the tectonic plate moves over a magma chamber hot spot.

Originally Posted by: StoneCroze 


Thank you for those thoughts. My son went Etna and other volcanoes on a school trip several years ago. I asked him to bring back some of the eruptions which he duly did. Very light black foam pieces.
On the same note, I brought back a lava bomb from Vestmannaeyjar in Iceland many more years before that. It has a dimple where it hit the ground red/white-hot.

I follow the Naples movements. If it ever does go off in our lifetimes or of course whenever, it will probably have a massive impact on European societies and further afield.
Vale of the Great Dairies
South Dorset
Elevation 60m 197ft
Chunky Pea
18 July 2024 15:27:06
According the 'Geologyhub', Iceland could be looking at yet another eruption soon as magma is building up again under the surface. 
Current Conditions
https://t.ly/MEYqg 


"You don't have to know anything to have an opinion"
--Roger P, 12/Oct/2022
Saint Snow
18 July 2024 16:21:43


The really alarming one is the Campi Flegrei caldera, a supervolcano underlying much of Naples which could blow any time, and has been producing rises and falls of several metres of ground level recently. When this blew about 40,000 years ago, the volume of ash ejected is conservatively estimated at 36 cubic miles (yes, the units are correct, and that's one of the lower estimates) and is thought to have wiped out early human and Neanderthal populations of Europe. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlegraean_Fields

Originally Posted by: DEW 




It's actually the magma which was at least 36 cubic miles (ash ejected was probably by multiples greater than that)

Vesuvius is, of course, part of that same Campanian Volcanic Arc that includes Campi Flegrei. In fact, the whole Bay of Naples is effectively a giant caldera.

Interestingly, and tying in with your first paragraph of that post, Roger, this Wiki article says:

"Campanian Volcanic Arc" is something of a term of convenience, since the area is part of the same large area of intense volcanic and seismic activity that includes, further to the south, the active island volcanoes of Stromboli, and Vulcano off the north coast of Sicily and even the largest active volcano in Europe, Mount Etna, on Sicily.




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campanian_volcanic_arc 

Having been to Naples, I can say that if a nearby volcano did majorly erupt, it would cause millions of Euros worth of improvements.



Martin
Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)
A TWO addict since 14/12/01
"How can wealth persuade poverty to use its political freedom to keep wealth in power? Here lies the whole art of Conservative politics."
Aneurin Bevan
DEW
  • DEW
  • Advanced Member
18 July 2024 16:48:49

It's actually the magma which was at least 36 cubic miles (ash ejected was probably by multiples greater than that)

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow 


I stand corrected - it was some sloppy copying from Wiki which in the next breath goes on to say that ash covered much of Russia.
War does not determine who is right, only who is left - Bertrand Russell

Chichester 12m asl
NMA
  • NMA
  • Advanced Member
19 July 2024 06:52:50

It's actually the magma which was at least 36 cubic miles (ash ejected was probably by multiples greater than that)

Vesuvius is, of course, part of that same Campanian Volcanic Arc that includes Campi Flegrei. In fact, the whole Bay of Naples is effectively a giant caldera.

Interestingly, and tying in with your first paragraph of that post, Roger, this Wiki article says:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campanian_volcanic_arc 

Having been to Naples, I can say that if a nearby volcano did majorly erupt, it would cause millions of Euros worth of improvements.

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow 


One way of putting it. A blessing introduced under a cloak of pyroclastic flows?
Of course we're spoilt for further explosive choices in that part of the world.
Further east into the Aegean, the huge Minoan eruption of Santorini in the 17th century BC may have inspired the legend of Atlantis. It was rated 7 in the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program's Volcanic Explosivity Index.
Today, the relatively new picturesque whitewashed Instagrammable houses would not be my choice of real estate (apologies for that Americanism) let alone a place to live. Why do people choose to live in or on active volcanoes?
Naples really takes the biscuit though.

Vale of the Great Dairies
South Dorset
Elevation 60m 197ft
Roger Parsons
21 July 2024 16:42:15
Jul 20, 2024: Surprising Eruption from Fuego Volcano, Guatemala


RogerP
West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire
Everything taken together, here in Lincolnshire are more good things than man could have had the conscience to ask.
William Cobbett, in his Rural Rides - c.1830
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