Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login. New Registrations are disabled.

Notification

Icon
Error

37 Pages«<34353637>
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Online ARTzeman  
#701 Posted : 03 December 2015 13:23:07(UTC)
ARTzeman

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/07/2012(UTC)
Posts: 25,618
Man
Location: Peasedown St John. N.E. Sommerset

Agree with Dew once swept off or wind dried then rotary is best this time of year. Wheels could cause tracks which will hold rain and turn to mud..

 

Some people walk in the rain.

Others just get wet.

Offline Bertwhistle  
#702 Posted : 03 December 2015 17:22:49(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: ARTzeman Go to Quoted Post

Agree with Dew once swept off or wind dried then rotary is best this time of year. Wheels could cause tracks which will hold rain and turn to mud..

 

I am genuinely grateful for the advice, both of you. You're right about the wheels- tried that, me the fool!

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#703 Posted : 06 December 2015 17:49:48(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Some posters on another thread were chatting about mushrooms appearing in a lawn now, which is not the most frequent time of year for them, as the mycelium (the main plant body) seems to sense the conditions somehow from underground ( not just from what the trees are up to, which is true for saprophytic but not decomposer groups) and detects subtle changes in light, moisture, warmth and CO2 levels. However, it's not a rare occurrence and I have logged notable (& even edible ) species in January. The warmth of late autumn this year is, of course, notable, and increasing numbers of flowering plant species are blooming, including 3 rose types and 3 clematis types, in our gardens.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#704 Posted : 10 December 2015 17:51:32(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

There are possibly as many as 100 fully-flowering daffodils wagging in the darkness on the lawn of the local fire station.

Yesterday, a child in my school was chased by a wasp.

Funny how the spiders stopped spinning at the very time the nasturtiums died.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline DEW  
#705 Posted : 14 December 2015 19:16:16(UTC)
DEW

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 11,942
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Hazel catkins now scattering pollen - not seen that before until early January. Bumble bee was around today on our winter flowering honeysuckle.

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline Bertwhistle  
#706 Posted : 14 December 2015 19:19:16(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Hazel catkins now scattering pollen - not seen that before until early January. Bumble bee was around today on our winter flowering honeysuckle.

With the wind, moisture and warmth it bodes well for early-flowering wind-pollinated trees.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Jonesy  
#707 Posted : 16 December 2015 10:09:13(UTC)
Jonesy

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 21/07/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,995
Man
Location: Medway

Some of our Spring shrubs are trying to bloom already, I reckon the summer ones will follow soon at this rate, will this have a knock on effect when we do get to Spring/Summer?

I really don't know what to do with them.

Medway Towns (Kent)

The Weather will do what it wants when it wants no matter what data is thrown at it !

RIP Dougie - The Current Conditions Thread Master .

Offline Bertwhistle  
#708 Posted : 16 December 2015 18:32:28(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Jonesy Go to Quoted Post

Some of our Spring shrubs are trying to bloom already, I reckon the summer ones will follow soon at this rate, will this have a knock on effect when we do get to Spring/Summer?

I really don't know what to do with them.

Depends on the shrub, Jonesy; some spring-flowering shrubs are well-suited to winter flowering- Mahonia and Viburnum included. When the leaves break from the bud on more tender plants, that's a risky time.

 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#709 Posted : 20 December 2015 09:11:48(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

The grasses on my lawn are now flowering; looks like a week of grass-growth ahead, at least. Wouldn't it be amazing (but not nice) if the pollen season started in December? 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Gooner  
#710 Posted : 20 December 2015 10:00:37(UTC)
Gooner

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 42,226
Man

About to mow the lawn

Remember anything after T120 is really Just For Fun

Marcus

Banbury

North Oxfordshire

378 feet A S L

Offline Bertwhistle  
#711 Posted : 20 December 2015 14:45:49(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Although not strictly in my garden, the following flowers on my walk today (all of which grow in my garden) were in full bloom:

sweet violet

doves-foot cranesbill

hogweed

marsh marigold

lesser celandine

There were also flags (yellow irises) in strong stem, though not budding yet.

I've not seen the marsh marigold flower before March.

 

 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#712 Posted : 22 December 2015 13:07:29(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 942
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Hi Nemi. I managed to cut the grass this week and am glad that I did - the mower could only just handle it. The warm winter has kept it growing. We have had primroses out, aconites, winter jasmine and even a clematis! The magnolia looks ready to go.
RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Gooner  
#713 Posted : 22 December 2015 13:20:41(UTC)
Gooner

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 42,226
Man

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post
Hi Nemi. I managed to cut the grass this week and am glad that I did - the mower could only just handle it. The warm winter has kept it growing. We have had primroses out, aconites, winter jasmine and even a clematis! The magnolia looks ready to go.

I had has much grass off my lawn as I do in May ....mental..........difference being the lawn is soaked

Remember anything after T120 is really Just For Fun

Marcus

Banbury

North Oxfordshire

378 feet A S L

Offline Bertwhistle  
#714 Posted : 22 December 2015 17:49:58(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Festive entertaining approaches and we've almost got a full-house (no spuds) on the vegetables: parsnips are a bit blotchy but good; Brussels and savoy doing well and ready and waiting; leeks (to go in a bacon, leek and tarragon side- seriously, you've got to give this one a go) great.

For Christmas Eve the celeriac is good for a celeriac and carrot salad but of course we have to buy the carrots. Anybody grow carrots into December?

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#715 Posted : 27 December 2015 16:44:12(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

The first crocus, a purple one, is flowering in the middle of our crocus lawn.

I took advice fro others on here about mowing, and it worked.... but it's all up again.

Now to plan how to mow around the crocus. 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Gooner  
#716 Posted : 28 December 2015 20:07:42(UTC)
Gooner

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 42,226
Man

Whats the best thing I can use to stop cats messing in the garden.............................help!!!!!

Remember anything after T120 is really Just For Fun

Marcus

Banbury

North Oxfordshire

378 feet A S L

Offline Bertwhistle  
#717 Posted : 29 December 2015 06:42:57(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,609
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Gooner Go to Quoted Post

Whats the best thing I can use to stop cats messing in the garden.............................help!!!!!

This problem drives me to distraction too. In the summer, I can't let the kids out sometimes, it's so bad.

All the posters on here will have their favourite; there are repellents that can be bought- chemical and electronic- but also some people make their own. The ultrasonic one can be costly although a company called Primrose does a solar powered one for less than a tenner, I believe. They cover a limited area. It sort of 'boxes' the cat's ears and in time they learn to avoid.

Some people use orange & lemon peel- but it's unsightly if you use more than a little & I can't say I've seen it work.

I use curry powder- cheap bulk stuff. They hate it. It's plant based so it won't do much damage and it does actually work while it lasts, but rain washes it in.

See what other posters think.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#718 Posted : 29 December 2015 06:59:37(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 942
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Get a Labrador - they will eat anything! We have had 4 over the past 30 years - but we are now dogless and the cat poo goes unhoovered. The upside is that I do not have to be constantly clearing up after the dogs! There's no such thing as a free lunch. However....

You can get devices with movement detectors that turn on a lawn sprinkler briefly when an animal is detected. Might be worth looking into.

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online ARTzeman  
#719 Posted : 29 December 2015 07:13:37(UTC)
ARTzeman

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/07/2012(UTC)
Posts: 25,618
Man
Location: Peasedown St John. N.E. Sommerset

Pyracantha clippings got thorns on ....

Edited by user 29 December 2015 07:15:51(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Some people walk in the rain.

Others just get wet.

Offline Gooner  
#720 Posted : 29 December 2015 13:05:17(UTC)
Gooner

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 42,226
Man

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

 

This problem drives me to distraction too. In the summer, I can't let the kids out sometimes, it's so bad.

All the posters on here will have their favourite; there are repellents that can be bought- chemical and electronic- but also some people make their own. The ultrasonic one can be costly although a company called Primrose does a solar powered one for less than a tenner, I believe. They cover a limited area. It sort of 'boxes' the cat's ears and in time they learn to avoid.

Some people use orange & lemon peel- but it's unsightly if you use more than a little & I can't say I've seen it work.

I use curry powder- cheap bulk stuff. They hate it. It's plant based so it won't do much damage and it does actually work while it lasts, but rain washes it in.

See what other posters think.

Cheers for that

Curry powder seems the option

Remember anything after T120 is really Just For Fun

Marcus

Banbury

North Oxfordshire

378 feet A S L

Users browsing this topic
Similar Topics
The Gardening Thread (TWO Community Science & Nature Forum)
by Bertwhistle 09/01/2016 20:21:30(UTC)
37 Pages«<34353637>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Code of conduct

× USER PHOTOS Sky Eye Camera Sky Eye Live Sky Eye Gallery MODEL CHARTS Arome Arpege ECM ECM ENS GEM GEFS GFS HIRLAM Icon Met Office UM Fax CFS GFSP