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Offline Lionel Hutz  
#1 Posted : 01 July 2020 10:39:07(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 4,135
Man
Ireland

I know that we've had various threads on this of late. I am opening a new one as the latest one is in the photography section but the topic doesn't really belong there. In the most recent one, I was saying that I had seen little evidence of the disease in Ireland, although I knew that it certainly was present here. Unfortunately, I have now discovered it on our own land. So far, it has only affected a couple of saplings, perhaps ten years old or so. I think that these trees were probably affected by it last summer and I'm kicking myself that I missed it then. I've taken advice and I will remove the affected trees at the weekend, even though they are only slightly affected. The main trunk can be stored for burning in the autumn(luckily, Ash is one of the few woods which can be burned straight after cutting). I will bag the parts which are too small for burning(including the leaves) and store them in a disused outhouse where they won't be able to contaminate any other trees.

I am hopeful that this might buy time for the nearby mature Ash trees, although one shows possible signs of very minor Chalara activity. I don't think that this disease will be anything like as fast moving as Dutch Elm disease. The problem for Elms is that the beetle manages to effectively inject the pathogen right inside the tree whereas Chalara is a bit more indirect in its mode of infection. The advice currently is simply to remove diseased trees but not to remove nearby unaffected Ashes. Hopefully, the fine matures Ash trees nearby will escape for now at least.

Edited by user 01 July 2020 10:42:02(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

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Online Justin W  
#2 Posted : 01 July 2020 16:03:49(UTC)
Justin W

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 14/06/2006(UTC)
Posts: 14,931
Location: North Downs, East Kent

Originally Posted by: Lionel Hutz Go to Quoted Post

I know that we've had various threads on this of late. I am opening a new one as the latest one is in the photography section but the topic doesn't really belong there. In the most recent one, I was saying that I had seen little evidence of the disease in Ireland, although I knew that it certainly was present here. Unfortunately, I have now discovered it on our own land. So far, it has only affected a couple of saplings, perhaps ten years old or so. I think that these trees were probably affected by it last summer and I'm kicking myself that I missed it then. I've taken advice and I will remove the affected trees at the weekend, even though they are only slightly affected. The main trunk can be stored for burning in the autumn(luckily, Ash is one of the few woods which can be burned straight after cutting). I will bag the parts which are too small for burning(including the leaves) and store them in a disused outhouse where they won't be able to contaminate any other trees.

I am hopeful that this might buy time for the nearby mature Ash trees, although one shows possible signs of very minor Chalara activity. I don't think that this disease will be anything like as fast moving as Dutch Elm disease. The problem for Elms is that the beetle manages to effectively inject the pathogen right inside the tree whereas Chalara is a bit more indirect in its mode of infection. The advice currently is simply to remove diseased trees but not to remove nearby unaffected Ashes. Hopefully, the fine matures Ash trees nearby will escape for now at least.

Fingers crossed for you, Lionel.

We are in a Chalara hotspot here and the effects are pretty devastating. We first noticed it on a couple of trees about seven years ago. Since then, it has ripped through the ash population with eight out of 10 either dead or showing clear signs of dieback. While nowhere near as fast moving as DED, it is moving through the UK ash population at a fair pace.

The good news is that there are still plenty of trees around here that show no signs of Chalara and many of them are in among badly affected trees so we are hopeful that there are a higher number of tolerant trees than originally predicted.

But it is devastating. The ash is my favourite tree.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter

MLK Jr

Offline Caz  
#3 Posted : 01 July 2020 17:14:57(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,565
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

So sorry to hear that Lionel!  I remember you posting on the last thread, when you were clear of it. I do hope your mature Ashes survive!  Keep us posted!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Lionel Hutz  
#4 Posted : 02 July 2020 08:42:11(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 4,135
Man
Ireland

Thanks, Caz and Justin. At least the trees affected can be fully disposed of relatively easily. There is also a crumb of comfort in the fact that they are on the Eastern side of a stand of mature Ash. Hopefully, the Chalara spores will tend to have been blown away from the other trees for the most part given the prevailing winds.

Interesting to hear about the situation near you, Justin. It's incredible how quickly it has spread in the seven years since it first arrived locally to you. Given how relatively slowly it appears to have been spreading here in Ireland, it's a reminder that we won't remain in our current state forever. I spoke to a friend of mine who lectures in forestry. What's interesting is how uncertain they are as regards the overall outcome of the disease. There are so many variables as to whether a tree will survive or not. It's not just down to possible natural resistance but also the overall health of the tree itself. Trees which look perfectly healthy may nonetheless be under stress and these will succumb more quickly. Conversely, some particularly vigorous trees, while not resistant, may be able to survive it. Obviously, it is going to be devastating but they're still not sure as to quite how bad it will get and how quickly. Hopefully, you're right and there are more resistant trees than originally thought. Mind you, 8 out of 10 sounds quite bad enough.

Undoubtedly, the Ash will be a huge loss to the countryside. Indeed, I think that it will be even more of a loss on this side of the Irish Sea. Over most of Ireland, the Ash is the commonest large tree of the fields and hedgerows so its loss will have a huge effect on our landscape and probably more so than over most of the UK. While the Ash will probably be replaced naturally to a large degree by other species in woodlands, I am not sure that there is any ready replacement for it in our hedgerows, certainly here in Ireland - the Ash is a very effective self seeder and I'm not sure what other tree would be as effective. Sycamore, perhaps?

Edited by user 02 July 2020 08:45:23(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

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