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Offline DEW  
#1 Posted : 22 June 2020 06:06:01(UTC)
DEW

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-53132567

Stonehenge: Neolithic monument found near sacred site

The headline is misleadng as Durrington Walls (2m. from Stonehenge) has been known for a long time and all that's been found is an extra ring of pits around the site. Durrington was a woodhenge, a much more temporary site than Stonehenge. On an English Heritage course there a few years back, we were told that the thinking was that Durrington was the camp for the Neolithic builders and visitors to Stonehenge, as all kinds of domestic leavings had been found there (pottery, animal bones etc) but nothing of the kind at Stonehenge.

The purpose of the Cursus nearby is still unknown. It was named by 18C antiquarians who thought it was a racetrack but modern discoveries of arrows and animal remains at one end only have led to theories that it was a site for a Neoliyhic biathlon e.g. to prove your manhood - run a mile a mile or so down the Cursus and shoot a pig at the end of it!

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805

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Offline Roger Parsons  
#2 Posted : 22 June 2020 06:44:33(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-53132567

Stonehenge: Neolithic monument found near sacred site

The headline is misleadng as Durrington Walls (2m. from Stonehenge) has been known for a long time and all that's been found is an extra ring of pits around the site. Durrington was a woodhenge, a much more temporary site than Stonehenge. On an English Heritage course there a few years back, we were told that the thinking was that Durrington was the camp for the Neolithic builders and visitors to Stonehenge, as all kinds of domestic leavings had been found there (pottery, animal bones etc) but nothing of the kind at Stonehenge.

The purpose of the Cursus nearby is still unknown. It was named by 18C antiquarians who thought it was a racetrack but modern discoveries of arrows and animal remains at one end only have led to theories that it was a site for a Neoliyhic biathlon e.g. to prove your manhood - run a mile a mile or so down the Cursus and shoot a pig at the end of it!

I once heard it suggested the true purpose of Woodhenge was education into the construction and use of such monuments - a "henge college" if you like. I have never seen any evidence to this effect, but it is an intriguing thought.

I've just read the BBC piece - very interesting. I used the following website over the Sumer Solstice and found it habit forming!

https://www.stonehengeskyscape.co.uk/

When I first visited Stonehenge in the early 50s [3 or 4] one could wander freely among the stones. I put my hand on one of the upright stones and a "keeper" warned me not to push it over!

R.

 

 

Edited by user 22 June 2020 06:47:48(UTC)  | Reason: typo

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline DEW  
#3 Posted : 22 June 2020 06:49:23(UTC)
DEW

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 13,853
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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

When I first visited Stonehenge in the early 50s [3 or 4] one could wander freely among the stones. I put my hand on one of the upright stones and a "keeper" warned me not to push it over!

R. 

Sitill possible to walk up and touch the stones early-mid 50's as a teenager - and the EH course referred to gave unrestricted access to the site before the official opening tme

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
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