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Online Roger Parsons  
#21 Posted : 27 June 2020 20:46:40(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#22 Posted : 01 July 2020 17:24:22(UTC)
Caz

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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Hmmm!  My elderflower concoction is still fermenting in the bottle but having tried it, it’s quite syrupy.  Any ideas?  It’s pleasant to drink but needs something else and my sister pointed out, it would be very nice mixed with Prosecco.  But I didn’t really want 20 litres of mixer!  Perhaps just soda water would make it the light summer drink I’d hoped for.

I’m leaving it as it is for now and still venting it as it isn’t refrigerated and I’m hoping it will ferment out a bit more.  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Caz  
#23 Posted : 14 July 2020 15:37:47(UTC)
Caz

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Just tasted my elderflower champagne and it isn’t at all syrupy now and still fermenting, so I’m still releasing pressure.  It has a nice pleasant fizz to it and is clearer but still has scum on the top, which doesn’t look pretty, so I think I probably should have filtered it again before bottling.  I might even try re-bottling some of it.

Overall I’m really pleased with it, despite my earlier reservations and I’ll definitely be making more next year.  All I need now is a few warm evenings to sit out and drink it.  I’m hoping to get my sisters round for a girl’s night to sample it!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Online Bertwhistle  
#24 Posted : 18 July 2020 10:06:03(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

Just tasted my elderflower champagne and it isn’t at all syrupy now and still fermenting, so I’m still releasing pressure.  It has a nice pleasant fizz to it and is clearer but still has scum on the top, which doesn’t look pretty, so I think I probably should have filtered it again before bottling.  I might even try re-bottling some of it.

Overall I’m really pleased with it, despite my earlier reservations and I’ll definitely be making more next year.  All I need now is a few warm evenings to sit out and drink it.  I’m hoping to get my sisters round for a girl’s night to sample it!  

You could try just decanting the scum/ scraping it off Caz. I've found each time I poured to filter kills some of the fizz- although as yours is still fermenting well, that'll be replaced. Funnily enough, all the gunk in my batch was at the bottom (until I released a little pressure- then it all went up, down, up, down. Quite messy.)

It's all gone now and it was my best tasting batch for 3 years. 

Got my eye on the damsons now.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#25 Posted : 20 July 2020 10:42:46(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Well done, Bert. I'm afraid that's how elderflower champagne behaves - you keep decompressing it and the sugars get converted to alcohol.

For smoked eel you could try The Fish Society. "The Online Fishmonger". I have bought laverbread from from them in the past.

Roger

Bert - meant to ask if you'd checked out their website. It did have smoked eel when I looked. I'd be interested to know if you'd tried them.  Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#26 Posted : 20 July 2020 12:08:21(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Bert - meant to ask if you'd checked out their website. It did have smoked eel when I looked. I'd be interested to know if you'd tried them.  Roger

 

It did have smoked eel and a very good price. I was excited Rog- would probably have spent a fortune. I registered as a new customer. But they wanted an alternative place to leave the fish if we weren't in and that's where I got stuck- there isn't anywhere/ anyone suitable at the moment. So we'll think through it. I won't let it go that easily.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#27 Posted : 20 July 2020 12:11:47(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

It did have smoked eel and a very good price. I was excited Rog- would probably have spent a fortune. I registered as a new customer. But they wanted an alternative place to leave the fish if we weren't in and that's where I got stuck- there isn't anywhere/ anyone suitable at the moment. So we'll think through it. I won't let it go that easily.

They could have left it with us, Bert....

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#28 Posted : 21 July 2020 17:12:51(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

They could have left it with us, Bert....

Roger

And then get forwarded an interesting smelling empty box? 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#29 Posted : 21 July 2020 17:42:51(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

And then get forwarded an interesting smelling empty box? 

Their polystyrene cold boxes used to be worth having, Bert - smelly or not. The one my laverbread came in became our "cold box" for a long while. Then when it deteriorated I incorporated it into a solar wax extractor as insulation. Into this we put all our old beeswax cappings and trimmings - melting them down into ingots of beeswax we could sell or exchange at the local beekeeping supermarket/factory. You can swap old wax for new "foundation"- like Aladdin's lamp. It's still being used to melt down our final bits of honeycomb - so we had 20+ years worth of upcycling from it.

http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/solarex.html

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Roger Parsons  
#30 Posted : 25 July 2020 07:43:40(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

We have had our usual early "flush" of red-cracking boleti in the garden. Sadly, these are hardly worth eating and quickly turn to mush on cooking - but they at least remind us of pleasures yet to come.

https://www.wildfooduk.c...uide/red-cracked-bolete/

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#31 Posted : 25 July 2020 10:24:15(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post
We have had our usual early "flush" of red-cracking boleti in the garden. Sadly, these are hardly worth eating and quickly turn to mush on cooking - but they at least remind us of pleasures yet to come.
https://www.wildfooduk.com/mushroom-guide/red-cracked-bolete/

Roger

Apart from Ceps, which seem to retain a marvellous texture regardless, I always remove the spongy pores from any boletes/ leccinums I gather, even the Bay and Orange Birch boletes. Reduces the quantity and it's a fiddly business, but it does improve the experience. I'm not sure if it would make a difference and reduce your 'mush' Rog; never tried the red-cracking variety. But the Brown Birch leccinum is soggy and mushy even with the pores removed.

Harvested a tree load of proper blue-black damsons (not cherry plums) from a favourite tree. It's early and they're firm, so I'll have to freeze or prick 'em. Now, where's that gin?

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#32 Posted : 26 July 2020 18:21:09(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Apart from Ceps, which seem to retain a marvellous texture regardless, I always remove the spongy pores from any boletes/ leccinums I gather, even the Bay and Orange Birch boletes. Reduces the quantity and it's a fiddly business, but it does improve the experience. I'm not sure if it would make a difference and reduce your 'mush' Rog; never tried the red-cracking variety. But the Brown Birch leccinum is soggy and mushy even with the pores removed.

Harvested a tree load of proper blue-black damsons (not cherry plums) from a favourite tree. It's early and they're firm, so I'll have to freeze or prick 'em. Now, where's that gin?

We've tried filleting the gills off the softer species, Bertie - but it's never been a success and their flavour does not match the excellent Cep. I've eaten a lot of fungus species now, but only about 6 are worth the trouble - for me. The experience of working my way through them was well worth it.

We visited our local blackberry bushes and wild apple tree today to assess progress. It won't be long now.

Interested to find the plant "Weld" on the river bank near a village which was once home to a Benedictine medical house [where monks went to be bled to "steady them down" as we say in Lincolnshire. ]   Given it was an important plant for dyeing and a component of the "Lincoln Green" process, I wonder if there was an associated dye industry as another string to mediaeval monastic work.

http://www.wildcolours.co.uk/html/weld.html

It might go back a lot further than that, as the Romans used the river for transport between Boston and Lincoln and they certainly knew and used Weld. The 9th Legion came here in about AD 50 so let's say it could have been grown here nearly 2000 years ago.

https://www.visitlincoln.com/trails/roman-heritage-trail-of-lincoln

Roger

 

 

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#33 Posted : 26 July 2020 18:48:04(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

 

Interested to find the plant "Weld" on the river bank near a village which was once home to a Benedictine medical house [where monks went to be bled to "steady them down" as we say in Lincolnshire. ]   Given it was an important plant for dyeing and a component of the "Lincoln Green" process, I wonder if there was an associated dye industry as another string to mediaeval monastic work.

Genuinely fascinating Roger.

I've never really branched out into non-food wild harvesting that much (although have used cleavers as an antiperspirant spray on- that was funny; and ramsons to keep the ticks off- that worked; why wouldn't it?)

Just followed up your post to see Lincoln Green might have been a weld-woad marriage.

I'm of a mind to have a go at this. Later. Do like it.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#34 Posted : 26 July 2020 19:34:58(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

 Genuinely fascinating Roger.

I've never really branched out into non-food wild harvesting that much (although have used cleavers as an antiperspirant spray on- that was funny; and ramsons to keep the ticks off- that worked; why wouldn't it?)

Just followed up your post to see Lincoln Green might have been a weld-woad marriage.

I'm of a mind to have a go at this. Later. Do like it.

I used to do a lot of plant pigment/chromatography-related stuff back in the olden days when one could do science in schools for the sheer joy of learning and not just to cram for exams. I used to go home exhaling ether!

R

 

p.s. You could also go down the "fibres" route and make yourself some nettle clothing!

 

Edited by user 27 July 2020 08:44:15(UTC)  | Reason: addition

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Roger Parsons  
#35 Posted : 08 August 2020 08:22:17(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
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Location: Lincolnshire

Good morning, Bertie. We had an early walk in a local Limewood today. Butterflies and dragonflies were just getting going, a deer was barking, BUT most importantly, a reasonably good pick of blackberries accomplished before 9am! Our first decent haul of the year. It was just starting to warm up as we started for home. Perfick. Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#36 Posted : 08 August 2020 14:41:02(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,250
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

Good morning, Bertie. We had an early walk in a local Limewood today. Butterflies and dragonflies were just getting going, a deer was barking, BUT most importantly, a reasonably good pick of blackberries accomplished before 9am! Our first decent haul of the year. It was just starting to warm up as we started for home. Perfick. Roger

Crumble, jelly or brandy Roger?

Or just with meringues, jus and creme anglais (how pretentious sounding!)

I meant, blackberry juice and custard.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#37 Posted : 08 August 2020 15:52:54(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Crumble, jelly or brandy Roger?

Or just with meringues, jus and creme anglais (how pretentious sounding!)

I meant, blackberry juice and custard.

This was the discussion on the way home, Bertie. We may drift towards jelly, syrup or as an ingredient - in ice lollies perhaps!

I find the pips a bit annoying now.

The wild plums are not quite there yet....

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

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