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Offline Bertwhistle  
#1 Posted : 25 April 2020 17:51:16(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Just harvested a great crop of jack by the hedge, ready to clean & cook tomorrow. Wilt it like spinach, and it has a garlicky edge; clean well first to get traffic pollution off of the plant.

https://www.wildfooduk.com/edible-wild-plants/hedge-garlic/

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

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Offline Bertwhistle  
#2 Posted : 25 April 2020 17:55:47(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

I see that my November 15 and August 18 attempts to perpetuate this thread receive a 'non valid request' reply from TWO. Just like to suggest that at this unprecedented time foraging might have countless benefits, if not to TWO.

Invalid
You've passed an invalid value to the forum.

Edited by user 25 April 2020 18:03:10(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#3 Posted : 25 April 2020 17:58:45(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

I see that my November 15 and August 18 attempts to perpetuate this thread receive a 'non valid request' reply from TWO. Just like to suggest that at this unprecedented time foraging might have countless benefits, if not to TWO.

You should be OK. Bert.

The UIA Coronavirus thread is mutating to Football chatter without comment, except from me so far.

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#4 Posted : 25 April 2020 19:53:35(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,575
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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Just harvested a great crop of jack by the hedge, ready to clean & cook tomorrow. Wilt it like spinach, and it has a garlicky edge; clean well first to get traffic pollution off of the plant.

https://www.wildfooduk.com/edible-wild-plants/hedge-garlic/

So pleased to see this thread back!  

I think I may have to try jack by the hedge and honesty!  Thanks Bertie!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Online Saint Snow  
#5 Posted : 25 April 2020 22:09:40(UTC)
Saint Snow

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Location: St Helens

I had a lovely bat and pangolin stew earlier. 

"Poverty exists not because we cannot feed the poor, but because we cannot satisfy the rich."

Martin

Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)

A TWO addict since 14/12/01

Offline Roger Parsons  
#6 Posted : 26 April 2020 07:21:45(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Saint Snow Go to Quoted Post

I had a lovely bat and pangolin stew earlier. 

I can well believe it. Saint. I would NEVER eat a pangolin, but did eat fruitbat once. Another story.

Returning to the topic of the thread, we have been reminding ourselves of the locations of wild plum trees in the hedgerows.

Nothing like being prepared.

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Bertwhistle  
#7 Posted : 26 April 2020 08:30:12(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

So pleased to see this thread back!  

I think I may have to try jack by the hedge and honesty!  Thanks Bertie!  

My pleasure Caz. Shame it's been so deeply archived we can't read all that input from many posters.

I never realised you could eat honesty- I used to worry about confusing it with J-B-T-H before the flowers come out as the leaves look slightly similar. Have added it to my look-for list now.

On another note, I've discovered Robin Harford at www.eatweeds.co.uk . He has written numerous articles/ books on the subject. He produces a regular free newsletter & offers wildfood chat and he replies to posts too, which is nice. In it, he states the case for the legitimacy of foraging as one of the acceptable forms of exercise.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#8 Posted : 26 April 2020 08:36:13(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

I can well believe it. Saint. I would NEVER eat a pangolin, but did eat fruitbat once. Another story.

Returning to the topic of the thread, we have been reminding ourselves of the locations of wild plum trees in the hedgerows.

Nothing like being prepared.

R.

Morning Roger.

I suppose fruit bat does qualify as wild food.

Had it in a curry in the Seychelles once. Long time ago. Not sure why, but I wouldn't do that again.

But it's a long time till the game birds are in season....

 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline NMA  
#9 Posted : 26 April 2020 08:38:09(UTC)
NMA

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Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,405
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Location: South Dorset

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

I can well believe it. Saint. I would NEVER eat a pangolin, but did eat fruitbat once. Another story.

Returning to the topic of the thread, we have been reminding ourselves of the locations of wild plum trees in the hedgerows.

Nothing like being prepared.

R.

And from another forum someone mentioned blackthorn flowered prolifically this year. So maybe a good sloe harvest later?

And worth remembering where crab apples grow, maybe for jelly making. I'm going to have a go with rose hip jelly too.

It was monitor lizard for me (tastes like chicken). The balintong that roamed the field office compound all those years ago only licked the ants off my legs so maybe I'm immune to COVID 19? What happened to the neighbours who eventually caught and ate the creature, who knows?

Offline Bertwhistle  
#10 Posted : 26 April 2020 09:10:07(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

 

And from another forum someone mentioned blackthorn flowered prolifically this year. So maybe a good sloe harvest later?

And worth remembering where crab apples grow, maybe for jelly making. I'm going to have a go with rose hip jelly too.

It was monitor lizard for me (tastes like chicken). The balintong that roamed the field office compound all those years ago only licked the ants off my legs so maybe I'm immune to COVID 19? What happened to the neighbours who eventually caught and ate the creature, who knows?

Morning Nick.

Might have given you this link before: www.fallingfruit.org

You can add your finds to the map- there's virtually nothing in S Dorset yet. My NOTW (not that far from Winchester) has loads on it. Once it's on, yes there's a slim risk others will want to share (although I never seem to face a dearth of fruit) but it means you can remember next time.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#11 Posted : 03 May 2020 08:50:37(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Ramson leaves thinly sliced and run through cooked potatoes, with olive oil, salt & pepper; best potato salad ever!

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Bertwhistle  
#12 Posted : 22 May 2020 17:27:30(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Redcurrants are just starting to redden in local woods.

The naturalised pear has set good little fruits in the park in the nearby town.

Ramsons are mostly over but we enjoyed the flowers and leaves for 3 weeks I think.

Now- elderflower is steeping in a bucket with lemon and sugar. Tomorrow will be bottling day. I use 2-litre sparkling water bottles, tightly screw-lidded after finishing. Important to ensure bottles are fizz-resistant.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#13 Posted : 22 May 2020 17:32:33(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Redcurrants are just starting to redden in local woods.

The naturalised pear has set good little fruits in the park in the nearby town.

Ramsons are mostly over but we enjoyed the flowers and leaves for 3 weeks I think.

Now- elderflower is steeping in a bucket with lemon and sugar. Tomorrow will be bottling day. I use 2-litre sparkling water bottles, tightly screw-lidded after finishing. Important to ensure bottles are fizz-resistant.

Well done. Bert. May I remind you that elderflower cordial makes the most wonderful ice lollies - as if you need reminding!

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Bertwhistle  
#14 Posted : 22 May 2020 17:35:56(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Well done. Bert. May I remind you that elderflower cordial makes the most wonderful ice lollies - as if you need reminding!

R.

Yes Rog- have made them with a squirt of sweetened lime but also with lemon balm- neither wild, sadly.

Tried with goosegogs once. Not that great.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#15 Posted : 05 June 2020 09:48:37(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Yes Rog- have made them with a squirt of sweetened lime but also with lemon balm- neither wild, sadly.

Tried with goosegogs once. Not that great.

Hello Bert. I was ASTOUNDED by the display of elderflowers driving to Boston and back yesterday. They pretty much lined my route.

The week ahead is definitely the EAT - Elderflower Action Time.

R.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Bertwhistle  
#16 Posted : 27 June 2020 16:47:46(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Well, the elderflower champagne was among the best I've made- but still short of the clear product my grandfather used to make. Finished it all off. Had to put it in the fridge to stop the yeast; it was getting fizzier, but also drier and stronger.

Desperate to find some smoked eel- any ideas?

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#17 Posted : 27 June 2020 17:10:12(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Well, the elderflower champagne was among the best I've made- but still short of the clear product my grandfather used to make. Finished it all off. Had to put it in the fridge to stop the yeast; it was getting fizzier, but also drier and stronger.

Desperate to find some smoked eel- any ideas?

Well done, Bert. I'm afraid that's how elderflower champagne behaves - you keep decompressing it and the sugars get converted to alcohol.

For smoked eel you could try The Fish Society. "The Online Fishmonger". I have bought laverbread from from them in the past.

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#18 Posted : 27 June 2020 18:05:42(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,575
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Well, the elderflower champagne was among the best I've made- but still short of the clear product my grandfather used to make. Finished it all off. Had to put it in the fridge to stop the yeast; it was getting fizzier, but also drier and stronger.

Desperate to find some smoked eel- any ideas?

I’ve followed your lead this year and made elderflower champagne (I think)!   It isn’t ready for drinking yet and may never be as I think I put too much sugar in it, in the quest for alcohol!  Picking the elderflowers was a spur of the moment thing and I wasn’t really prepared.

I only had two lemons and needed ten for the 20 litre yeast free recipe, so I added more two days later.  Then I left it for another week as I was working long shifts, so I added more sugar to keep it going until I had time to get it strained and bottled, which I did four days ago.  

It’s in plastic bottles and is obviously still fermenting as I’m having to vent them when they look bloated but that brings the sediment Up and leaves scum round the top.  I think maybe I should have left it in a tub for a couple more days and strained it again.  However it turns out, I’ll be making it again next year!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Roger Parsons  
#19 Posted : 27 June 2020 18:27:45(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 3,022
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

I’ve followed your lead this year and made elderflower champagne (I think)!   It isn’t ready for drinking yet and may never be as I think I put too much sugar in it, in the quest for alcohol!  Picking the elderflowers was a spur of the moment thing and I wasn’t really prepared.

I only had two lemons and needed ten for the 20 litre yeast free recipe, so I added more two days later.  Then I left it for another week as I was working long shifts, so I added more sugar to keep it going until I had time to get it strained and bottled, which I did four days ago.  

It’s in plastic bottles and is obviously still fermenting as I’m having to vent them when they look bloated but that brings the sediment Up and leaves scum round the top.  I think maybe I should have left it in a tub for a couple more days and strained it again.  However it turns out, I’ll be making it again next year!  

Keep venting, Caz! Plastic bottles can blow their tops off - you don't want to get one in the eye. Always a good idea to wrap the neck/cap in a cloth as you do it. In early attempts at ginger beer and EF Champagne I made the mistake of using 70s disposable glass bottles. We went away for the weekend and the door to our flat made an ominous scrunching noise as we opened it on our return. Whether all the bottle blew up together or perhaps one triggered a chain reaction we never worked out - but there was glass halfway up the stairs. Good job we were not at home!

Don't worry about the sediment - it should be less of a problem by the time you reach the drinking point. A slow decompression and a gentle, steady pouring should solve the problem - If you like you can decant the bulk of the liquid into a jug once the gassing has stopped - tho then you need to drink it! I am reminded of Puckoon - "Mix all the goodness in!".

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#20 Posted : 27 June 2020 19:33:31(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,575
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Keep venting, Caz! Plastic bottles can blow their tops off - you don't want to get one in the eye. Always a good idea to wrap the neck/cap in a cloth as you do it. In early attempts at ginger beer and EF Champagne I made the mistake of using 70s disposable glass bottles. We went away for the weekend and the door to our flat made an ominous scrunching noise as we opened it on our return. Whether all the bottle blew up together or perhaps one triggered a chain reaction we never worked out - but there was glass halfway up the stairs. Good job we were not at home!

Don't worry about the sediment - it should be less of a problem by the time you reach the drinking point. A slow decompression and a gentle, steady pouring should solve the problem - If you like you can decant the bulk of the liquid into a jug once the gassing has stopped - tho then you need to drink it! I am reminded of Puckoon - "Mix all the goodness in!".

  I’ve heard a fair few tales about exploding bottles from home brewers!

I’d been saving Prosecco bottles but as I wasn’t prepared I hadn’t bought corks and cages for them, so I appealed to the family for plastic fizzy drinks bottles.  A tip I got off the Internet to avoid exploding plastic bottles, is to push a thumb dent into the bottle and vent when the pressure flattens it out. 

I was considering re-bottling the lot to get rid of the sediment but given your advice, I’ll leave it for now.  I do think it needs to ferment for a while longer as it was as sweet as cordial when I bottled it.  I’m relying on the natural wild yeast in the elderflower, so I don’t know how much alcohol it will stand before being killed off.  So I could end up with no fizz and I might have to buy some champagne yeast to prime it again.  All good fun and lessons being learnt!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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