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Offline Roger Parsons  
#1 Posted : 06 April 2020 06:58:32(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Deleted - difficulty editing... more later

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

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Offline llamedos  
#2 Posted : 06 April 2020 07:21:49(UTC)
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A number of butterflies again yesterday and also saw the first wasp of the year. Amazing how a bit of warmth brings more than just flowers and dormant shrubs to life 

"Life with the Lions"

Offline DEW  
#3 Posted : 06 April 2020 08:29:13(UTC)
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Also seen first wasp, not big enough for a queen (unless there is a species with small queens) plus bumble bees and several beeflies. Honeybees not yet in evidence but I expect they'll find the ceanothus (cf Forum Arms post) once it's fully out.

BTW, a bumble who strayed into our conservatory was tangled up in a web, and a comparatively diminutive spider was approaching it. I suppose in the interests of science I should have waited to see whethe spider venom was powerful enough a bee perhaps 100x as massive, but I decided to rescue the bumble and put it back outside.

Edited by user 06 April 2020 08:32:37(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline llamedos  
#4 Posted : 06 April 2020 09:18:21(UTC)
llamedos

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Also seen first wasp, not big enough for a queen (unless there is a species with small queens) plus bumble bees and several beeflies. Honeybees not yet in evidence but I expect they'll find the ceanothus (cf Forum Arms post) once it's fully out.

BTW, a bumble who strayed into our conservatory was tangled up in a web, and a comparatively diminutive spider was approaching it. I suppose in the interests of science I should have waited to see whethe spider venom was powerful enough a bee perhaps 100x as massive, but I decided to rescue the bumble and put it back outside.

  I'm an avid bee rescuer and have had very resulting few stings 

"Life with the Lions"

Offline DEW  
#5 Posted : 09 April 2020 20:51:08(UTC)
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A non-sighting? The bees haven't found my ceanoths yet, just a lot of small hoverflies

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline ktaylor  
#6 Posted : 11 April 2020 06:41:06(UTC)
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Most common I'm seeing is bumble bees, there have been a few butterflies. No wasps but they generally are a pain and don't want to see them cause they like to hang by my back door. The thing I haven't seen for a couple of years now are stag beetles, never heard or seen them before until I moved to ryarsh then one landed on me gave a bit of a shock as didn't know what it was. After that was seeing them every year even saw one get taken out the air in mid flight by a black bird that was good to watch not for the stag beetle. I'm sure they are a protected species and will keep eye out for them again. Usually I have seen them in the evenings. Fingers crossed they will reappear 

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Offline Roger Parsons  
#7 Posted : 12 April 2020 19:17:52(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: ktaylor Go to Quoted Post

Most common I'm seeing is bumble bees, there have been a few butterflies.

I spotted 4 Holly Blues today. 2 male, 2 female.

https://butterfly-conservation.org/butterflies/holly-blue

Lots of bumble bee queens about - the common ones can be identified here:

https://www.bumblebee.org/key.htm

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline DEW  
#8 Posted : 13 April 2020 06:41:59(UTC)
DEW

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

A non-sighting? The bees haven't found my ceanoths yet, just a lot of small hoverflies

Bees had found the ceanothus yesterday - you could hear them across the garden!

I know a successful foraging bee can do its 'waggle dance' and direct others to the source of pollen/nectar; but do bees remember this info for the next day, or do they have to go out and forage again?

A blue butterfly (holly blue?) seen in the middle of town yesterday

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline llamedos  
#9 Posted : 13 April 2020 07:12:14(UTC)
llamedos

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Had a male Brimstone fluttering in the sunshine yesterday morning.

"Life with the Lions"

Offline Roger Parsons  
#10 Posted : 13 April 2020 07:22:16(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Bees had found the ceanothus yesterday - you could hear them across the garden!

I know a successful foraging bee can do its 'waggle dance' and direct others to the source of pollen/nectar; but do bees remember this info for the next day, or do they have to go out and forage again?

A blue butterfly (holly blue?) seen in the middle of town yesterday

A waggle dance is based on current information. DEW, as the timing of nectar flow does vary between flower species and bees need to "go with the flow". No point in visiting uncooperative flowers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12Q8FfyLLso

My money is your butterfly being a Holly Blue.

Roger

 

Edited by user 13 April 2020 08:16:42(UTC)  | Reason: - line space

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline DEW  
#11 Posted : 13 April 2020 09:40:24(UTC)
DEW

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Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

A waggle dance is based on current information. DEW, as the timing of nectar flow does vary between flower species and bees need to "go with the flow". No point in visiting uncooperative flowers.

Roger

 

Not quite what I meant, which was, if a bee visited my ceanothus yesterday, does it remember and make that its first call again today to check it out before trying elsewhere (irrespective of yesterday's waggle dance) , or does it have to rely on visual and scent clues afresh each day?

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline Roger Parsons  
#12 Posted : 13 April 2020 10:42:57(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

 Not quite what I meant, which was, if a bee visited my ceanothus yesterday, does it remember and make that its first call again today to check it out before trying elsewhere (irrespective of yesterday's waggle dance) , or does it have to rely on visual and scent clues afresh each day?

I don't recall if bees recall, DEW - my understanding is "scout bees" and foragers are constantly searching and reporting. Here a rather good paper on it:

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/82891504.pdf

Roger

 

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline DEW  
#13 Posted : 13 April 2020 11:18:35(UTC)
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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

I don't recall if bees recall, DEW - my understanding is "scout bees" and foragers are constantly searching and reporting. Here a rather good paper on it:

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/82891504.pdf

Roger

 

Thanks - an interesting perspective on bee habits. The emphasis in the paper is on foraging as a first stage, which implies no recall, though that doesn't seem to be stated explicitly.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline Roger Parsons  
#14 Posted : 13 April 2020 12:59:40(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Thanks - an interesting perspective on bee habits. The emphasis in the paper is on foraging as a first stage, which implies no recall, though that doesn't seem to be stated explicitly.

During a worker bee's lifetime they fulfill different roles as they age, DEW. I have no doubt bees have memory, but things vary and change in the world of flowers and the rhythm of nectar yield varies across the day. You may think you never see bees of some flowers, but that could be because they were worked while you were still in bed! Pumpkins are like that. Nectar at about 4am. I think what happens is at some point a worker bee is motivated to communicate her knowledge of the day. Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#15 Posted : 13 April 2020 13:15:09(UTC)
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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Three orange tip butterflies spotted here yesterday. 

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Online Rob K  
#16 Posted : 14 April 2020 08:51:41(UTC)
Rob K

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Location: Northeast Hampshire

Originally Posted by: ktaylor Go to Quoted Post

Most common I'm seeing is bumble bees, there have been a few butterflies. No wasps but they generally are a pain and don't want to see them cause they like to hang by my back door. The thing I haven't seen for a couple of years now are stag beetles, never heard or seen them before until I moved to ryarsh then one landed on me gave a bit of a shock as didn't know what it was. After that was seeing them every year even saw one get taken out the air in mid flight by a black bird that was good to watch not for the stag beetle. I'm sure they are a protected species and will keep eye out for them again. Usually I have seen them in the evenings. Fingers crossed they will reappear 

I used to see stag beetles quite a lot round here when I was a kid, then they seemed to decline but in recent years I have seen quite a few. None this year as yet - maybe a bit early?

Lots of insects in the garden though: plenty of bees, both bumble bees and honey bees, plus hoverflies, ladybirds, bright red lily beetles, and butterflies including what I think are holly blues but haven't had a close enough look to be sure.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Offline Northern Sky  
#17 Posted : 23 April 2020 15:53:55(UTC)
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Location: Leeds W Yorks

Had a walk in the woods near my house earlier and saw loads of butterflies. Orange tip, Peacock, lots of whites and, something I've not seen before 3 commas fighting? mating? chasing each other all over. One landed near me on the path and had part of it's wing missing, not that it seemed to hinder it.

Offline DEW  
#18 Posted : 28 April 2020 06:46:40(UTC)
DEW

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Judging by the amount of buzzing going on, yesterday the bees had deserted the ceanothus (still in full flower) for the holly tree 10m. away. The holly is a large male tree, and has so much flower at the moment that it looks white rather than green.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
Offline Roger Parsons  
#19 Posted : 28 April 2020 07:07:41(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

Judging by the amount of buzzing going on, yesterday the bees had deserted the ceanothus (still in full flower) for the holly tree 10m. away. The holly is a large male tree, and has so much flower at the moment that it looks white rather than green.

Hello DEW. Holly flowers will attract bees, and not only honey bees. Some of the solitary mining bees like it too and I have also observed the males gathering there in hope, rather as the young of the parish used the bus shelter in happier days.

e.g.

https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/tawnyminingbee/

https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/blog/ryan-clark/guide-solitary-bees-britain

Our little bay tree [in a pot] is covered with frothy-looking white flowers.

Roger

Edited by user 28 April 2020 11:19:31(UTC)  | Reason: typos

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline DEW  
#20 Posted : 02 May 2020 10:56:37(UTC)
DEW

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The holly flowers have all gone, helped on their way by wind and rain, so the bees are back in force on the ceanothus

Photo Sat 2/5/20

So why did they desert the ceanothus temporarily? Surely they don't have a hive memory of how long each flower species lasts, and switched to the holly while it was still there? The sensible alternative is that the holly must have been putting out some signal (UV colour? scent?) which was more powerful than the ceanothus, or possibly the holly had a better nectar yield.

It has been observed that less snow falls here than any other place of equal extent in the kingdom, occasioned by the shelter of the hills and the warmth of the sea breezes - Alexander Hay, Guide to Chichester, 1805
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