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Offline Devonian  
#1 Posted : 14 August 2019 18:24:11(UTC)
Devonian

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"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"
Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016
"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"
Osborne, 22/12/18.

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Online Bertwhistle  
#2 Posted : 14 August 2019 20:25:24(UTC)
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A quote from the article:


Microplastics are defined as those particles below 5mm in size.


Is that right? Half a cm? 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Online Bugglesgate  
#3 Posted : 14 August 2019 20:56:11(UTC)
Bugglesgate

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Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post


A quote from the article:


Microplastics are defined as those particles below 5mm in size.


Is that right? Half a cm? 



 


Apparently :-


Microplastics are not a specific kind of plastic, but rather any type of plastic fragment that is less than 5 mm in length according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).[2][3]


 


REF: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microplastics


 


 


 

Chris
Between Newbury and Basingstoke
"When they are giving you their all, some stagger and fall, after all it's not easy banging your heart against some mad buggers wall"
Online Bertwhistle  
#4 Posted : 15 August 2019 10:34:06(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Originally Posted by: Bugglesgate Go to Quoted Post


 


 


Apparently :-


Microplastics are not a specific kind of plastic, but rather any type of plastic fragment that is less than 5 mm in length according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).[2][3]


 


REF: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microplastics


 


 


 



So we have (up to) half cm pieces of plastic bowing around in the air. I can only surmise that these must e visible and tangible. Interesting that the article also says they are moved through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Could some of these come from shredded aircraft waste?

Bertie, Itchen Valley.
Remember Finlake!
Offline Rob K  
#5 Posted : 15 August 2019 11:00:34(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post


 


So we have (up to) half cm pieces of plastic bowing around in the air. I can only surmise that these must e visible and tangible. Interesting that the article also says they are moved through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Could some of these come from shredded aircraft waste?



The pieces in the air will be much smaller than that - mostly windborne fibres, I should imagine.


If you want to see a good source of those, look in the lint screen in your tumble dryer. Your average load of washing releases several million plastic microfibres - more if you wash things like fleeces.

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Online Bugglesgate  
#6 Posted : 15 August 2019 12:32:54(UTC)
Bugglesgate

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Originally Posted by: Rob K Go to Quoted Post


 


The pieces in the air will be much smaller than that - mostly windborne fibres, I should imagine.


If you want to see a good source of those, look in the lint screen in your tumble dryer. Your average load of washing releases several million plastic microfibres - more if you wash things like fleeces.



I'm now a bit conflicted about this. Traditionally I've gone for cotton / poly mix shirts (etc) becuase they  last longer than pure cotton.  I guess it's  a trade-off  between   increasing plastic fibre waste and  increased  use of resources re manufacturing  

Chris
Between Newbury and Basingstoke
"When they are giving you their all, some stagger and fall, after all it's not easy banging your heart against some mad buggers wall"
Offline Gandalf The White  
#7 Posted : 15 August 2019 18:05:55(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Bugglesgate Go to Quoted Post


 


I'm now a bit conflicted about this. Traditionally I've gone for cotton / poly mix shirts (etc) becuase they  last longer than pure cotton.  I guess it's  a trade-off  between   increasing plastic fibre waste and  increased  use of resources re manufacturing  



There was a BBC programme recently on this subject. They put monitoring equipment into some homes and found these fibres were present in surprisingly high concentrations.


If you think how many millions of items of clothing containing man-made material have been made around the world is it surprising that there's so much of it in the environment?


What we are doing to the planet is a growing nightmare. Personally I'm in despair and don't see this ever being fixed.

Location: South Cambridgeshire
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52.2N 0.5E
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Offline DEW  
#8 Posted : 16 August 2019 06:23:02(UTC)
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Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: Gandalf The White Go to Quoted Post


What we are doing to the planet is a growing nightmare. Personally I'm in despair and don't see this ever being fixed.



I wouldn't be surprised if the bacteria fix it for us. They've only had 80 years or so since polythene and nylon were discovered, and less for other thermoplastics, to find a mutation to exploit this food source and I hope they do it sooner rather than later. Mind you, when they do, plastic packaging and nylon clothing, especially in a moist environment, will become less useful. 


The widespread domestic use of thermoplastics only dates from about 1950. I can remember my father bringing home from work the first polythene cup  we had ever seen  for us all to goggle at. That was in 1948 or 1949, and it was being handed out as a measuring cup for veterinary medicine (He worked in distribution for Boots the Chemists who at that time extended their range to animal medicines)

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
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