Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login. New Registrations are disabled.

Notification

Icon
Error

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Offline DEW  
#1 Posted : 12 July 2019 18:17:08(UTC)
DEW

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 11,898
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

A bit later on and you can find rarities such as Gentian and Autumn Ladies' Tresses here. Enlarge by clicking https://i.ibb.co/C8Thv7t/Noar-Hill-flower-bank.jpg 

 

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys

Wanna join the discussion?! Login to your TheWeatherOutlook forum account. New Registrations are disabled.

Offline Caz  
#2 Posted : 13 July 2019 04:42:19(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 18,089
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

  Now that’s what I call a meadow!  It reminds me of the Cadbury’s flake advert!  I wonder if they’re all naturally occurring, or if they’ve been sown.  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

Join the fun of the monthly CET competition. Last chance to join in the yearly comp is 2nd March. Discuss monthly temperatures and records.

Offline four  
#3 Posted : 13 July 2019 06:45:45(UTC)
four

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 07/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 19,201
Location: N.Y.Moors

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

 naturally occurring, 


Meadows like that are mostly the result of cutting for hay or grazing at certain times of year, it might look kind of disastrous to go in and cut it all down but not regularly removing nutrients encourages coarse grasses and other weedy stuff like docks, nettles, cow parsley
There are a few places with naturally very poor soil will produce suitable conditions, you sometimes see it in the most unlikely locations such as steep motorway verges.
(fairly) locally at Redcar the old steelworks used to tip slag and other waste out over sand dunes until the 1960s, that area is now a remarkable reserve with orchids and many other plants not found anywhere else along the coast. 

Offline DEW  
#4 Posted : 13 July 2019 06:54:15(UTC)
DEW

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 11,898
Man
Location: Chichester 12m. asl

Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post


Meadows like that are mostly the result of cutting for hay or grazing at certain times of year, it might look kind of disastrous to go in and cut it all down but not regularly removing nutrients encourages coarse grasses and other weedy stuff like docks, nettles, cow parsley
There are a few places with naturally very poor soil will produce suitable conditions, you sometimes see it in the most unlikely locations such as steep motorway verges.
(fairly) locally at Redcar the old steelworks used to tip slag and other waste out over sand dunes until the 1960s, that area is now a remarkable reserve with orchids and many other plants not found anywhere else along the coast. 

Poor soil is the explanation here - the area is on the site of old chalk pits with thin alkaline soils and there's some 'cutting', done by cattle allowed to graze at appropriate times of year.

Edited by user 13 July 2019 06:55:34(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline Caz  
#5 Posted : 13 July 2019 10:18:34(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 18,089
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

It’s funny you should both mention poor soil.  Yesterday I was working with my daughter in her garden and remarked on the good quality of soil. She said when she’s talked about gardening on the forums she’s a member of, it seems the UK has a reputation for quality soil as several of her foreign friends are envious of it.  I suppose we notice poor soil because it doesn’t occur much here and when it does, it produces gems! 

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

Join the fun of the monthly CET competition. Last chance to join in the yearly comp is 2nd March. Discuss monthly temperatures and records.

Offline Roger Parsons  
#6 Posted : 13 July 2019 11:40:06(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 909
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

It’s funny you should both mention poor soil.  Yesterday I was working with my daughter in her garden and remarked on the good quality of soil. She said when she’s talked about gardening on the forums she’s a member of, it seems the UK has a reputation for quality soil as several of her foreign friends are envious of it.  I suppose we notice poor soil because it doesn’t occur much here and when it does, it produces gems! 

When people ask about growing wild flower species my first comment is always to talk about lowering fertility by removing clippings, avoiding any fertilizer and [if appropriate] introducing yellow rattle. Often when you do this all kinds of unexpected plants pop up, especially if the soil has been a bit disturbed. I came across the following webpage yesterday which is quite interesting - though I do not agree with a couple of points.

It is quite difficult to reduce the fertility of many Lincolnshire soils, as you can imagine.

https://theconversation.com/four-steps-to-make-your-lawn-a-wildlife-haven-from-green-desert-to-miniature-rainforest-117482

This might interest some TWO gardeners:

https://www.growwilduk.com/

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Gandalf The White  
#7 Posted : 13 July 2019 12:23:05(UTC)
Gandalf The White

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 35,183
Man

Meadows were featured on last night's Gardeners World on BBC2. Meadows were cited in particular as excellent for pollinators as well as for native species. The need for poor soil was mentioned more than once.

Location: South Cambridgeshire

130 metres ASL

52.2N 0.5E

Brexit: proof that you can fool people into making a stupid choice

Offline Roger Parsons  
#8 Posted : 13 July 2019 14:37:39(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 909
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Just picked up on this clip from the north of the county. Might make you smile.
Rare bee orchids thriving in Lincolnshire garden
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-humber-48967942/rare-bee-orchids-thriving-in-lincolnshire-garden


[If you are following "Wild Bill" this would not be the correct accent for Boston and the surrounding fens either. The fake caricature of northern accents in the series is almost as "criminally inaccurate" as a police chief has described the story line!]

Roger

Edited by user 13 July 2019 14:40:20(UTC)  | Reason: + addition + bold

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Users browsing this topic
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Code of conduct

× USER PHOTOS Sky Eye Camera Sky Eye Live Sky Eye Gallery MODEL CHARTS Arome Arpege ECM ECM ENS GEM GEFS GFS HIRLAM Icon Met Office UM Fax CFS GFSP