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Offline Northern Sky  
#1 Posted : 14 June 2019 21:21:20(UTC)
Northern Sky

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Location: Leeds W Yorks

Has anyone got any science and nature book recommendations?

I'll make a start with some I have read recently - 

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohllenben - an incredible insight into the lives of trees. You will never look at a tree in the same way again after reading this book.

Linescapes by Hugh Warwick - really interesting read with much food for thought.

 

Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature is Surviving in an Age of Extinction by Chris D Thomas - I can't recommend this enough. 

 

Wilding by Isabella Tree  - I'm halfway though this fantastic book which was recommended to me by Lionel a while ago. It's inspirational.

Edited by user 15 June 2019 07:56:34(UTC)  | Reason: Correct link for Wilding

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Online Bertwhistle  
#2 Posted : 14 June 2019 21:41:06(UTC)
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If you don't mind a historical slant to Science, NS, then Gilbert White's Natural History of Selborne is a good catch.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline DEW  
#3 Posted : 15 June 2019 05:51:07(UTC)
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The Hidden Life of Trees - I thought it was fine as long as he kept to observations but had a tendency to drift off into the mystical.

 

Any way, two more, personally recommended:

Extraordinary Insects by Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson (just published, Harper Collins)

and from further back

The Cloudspotter's Guide by Gavin Pretor-Pinney (2006, Hodder & Stoughton)

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline DEW  
#4 Posted : 15 June 2019 06:04:37(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Northern Sky Go to Quoted Post

Wilding by Isabella Tree  - I'm halfway though this fantastic book which was recommended to me by Lionel a while ago. It's inspirational.

Refers to the Knepp Castle project, just off the A24. Herewith a couple of photos taken  2011 from the public footpath which runs through the estate [your link actually directs to the previous book]

UserPostedImage


UserPostedImage

They also have some Old English cattle with amazingly threatening horns, alarming to meet facing you on a footpath (at Dial Post, a bit south of the main park , for those who know the area) but quite placid.

 

Edited by user 15 June 2019 06:06:47(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Online Roger Parsons  
#5 Posted : 15 June 2019 06:49:54(UTC)
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I notice from their recent newsletter that Wilding has recently made the finalists list on NHBS' Wainwright Book Prize. See: "Bestsellers in Good Reads":

https://www.nhbs.com/

Roger

 

 

Edited by user 15 June 2019 07:36:42(UTC)  | Reason: photos removed

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Northern Sky  
#6 Posted : 15 June 2019 08:10:29(UTC)
Northern Sky

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Location: Leeds W Yorks

I've corrected the link to Wilding thanks for that DEW. The cattle are English Longhorns, I can imagine it being a little worrying encountering them especially if you are walking a dog! Apparently very docile though as with all cattle can be very protective of their calves.

I'd love to visit Knepp what an amazing project and a little bit more amazing now that White Storks are nesting there, the first for hundreds of years!

I know what you mean about the Hidden Life of Trees and at first I wasn't sure about his tendency to anthropomorphism but after a bit I just decided to roll with it on account of the fact that he's a bit nuts. From then on I just let the information wash over me which was astonishing.

And thanks for the recommendations, they are on my list 

Edited by user 15 June 2019 08:12:59(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline Lionel Hutz  
#7 Posted : 17 June 2019 09:00:08(UTC)
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Good idea, this thread.

"Woodlands" by Oliver Rackham is excellent though it's a bit of a tome and not exactly a light read. Still, it gives a great account of the history of trees in the UK(and Ireland to some degree also) and is well worth the effort. 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Woodlands-Oliver-Rackham/dp/0008156913/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=woodlands&qid=1560761522&s=gateway&smid=A1G3UP32AZJ14F&sr=8-1

"The Ash Tree", also by Rackham https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ash-Tree-Paperback-Monographs/dp/1908213426/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=the+ash+rackham&qid=1560761652&s=books&sr=1-1 is well worth a look too. Indeed, it manages to provide a certain amount of the information contained in "Woodlands" in a much shorter form. Being about Ash, it's quite topical at the moment and discusses the recent spread of tree diseases and pests also. It was written in 2014 so it's probably the last book that Rackham wrote before his death.

"Say Goodbye to the Cuckoo" is another excellent one, if a little depressing https://www.amazon.co.uk/Say-Goodbye-Cuckoo-Michael-McCarthy/dp/1848540620/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1QZREEXL2P68X&keywords=say+goodbye+to+the+cuckoo&qid=1560761978&s=books&sprefix=say+goodbye+to+the+cuc%2Caps%2C133&sr=1-1

It deals with the birds that come to us each summer such as the swallow, cuckoo etc. It's somewhat depressing in so far as it charts their decline. Despite that, there's a lot to be learned from the book. Indeed, anything by McCarthy is worth a look in my view, such as "The Moth Snowstorm" https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1444792792/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i0 

 

 

Edited by user 17 June 2019 09:03:54(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

Offline Northern Sky  
#8 Posted : 19 June 2019 11:14:28(UTC)
Northern Sky

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Location: Leeds W Yorks

Some interesting recommendations there Lionel. How did you find the The Moth Snowstorm? I find it difficult reading books that seem to wallow in despair (not saying this does as I've not read it) but it's something I can apply to a few nature books I've read. I totally understand recording and mourning decline but I also want to read something proactive that comes out fighting with a practical response. This is probably why I'm enjoying Wilding so much.

 

Offline Lionel Hutz  
#9 Posted : 19 June 2019 20:55:17(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

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Originally Posted by: Northern Sky Go to Quoted Post

Some interesting recommendations there Lionel. How did you find the The Moth Snowstorm? I find it difficult reading books that seem to wallow in despair (not saying this does as I've not read it) but it's something I can apply to a few nature books I've read. I totally understand recording and mourning decline but I also want to read something proactive that comes out fighting with a practical response. This is probably why I'm enjoying Wilding so much.

 

I know what you mean. The Moth Snowstorm is a tough read at times. I have to say that even though I don't really want to. It's a very personal book at times since, in addition to the natural world, it also deals with his childhood. His childhood was wasn't easy as his mother was mentally unwell. Some of those bits are almost heartbreaking. 

And the natural world parts are pretty tough too. I distinctly recall one part about a huge wetland area in South Korea, a vital stopping off area for migrating birds and all about to be bulldozed as either a new port or industrial zone.

Still, there are more cheerful parts. The full title to the book is The Moth Snowstorm,  nature and joy. So it's not all doom. His glass is more half empty than half full though. Maybe I'm a gloomy ould sod myself 😉

 

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

Offline DEW  
#10 Posted : 06 July 2019 05:47:34(UTC)
DEW

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Book review of recently published book detailing Oxford weather over 250 years

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Book-Review-Oxford-Weather-and-Climate-1767?cm_ven=cat6-widget

The review itself quotes interesting records from the book

 

£35 from Amazon though there are discounted offers; can also be read free on Google books (seems unfair and unusual for arecently published book?)

https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Oxford_Weather_and_Climate_Since_1767.html?id=4CCWDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

Edited by user 06 July 2019 05:51:53(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Offline agw2  
#11 Posted : 06 July 2019 21:39:59(UTC)
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Ice by Fred Hoyle

A controversial book presenting Fred's ideas about the cause of ice ages. He admits it is controversial.

While we are here has anybody read this?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/ne...nce-environment-48265217

I know this is verboten, but this is the only forum I post in, and that sporadically. I'm starting to get withdrawal symptoms. Hey Ho.

Offline agw2  
#12 Posted : 06 July 2019 21:58:01(UTC)
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Childhoods End, 2001 by Arthur C Clarke

What do you mean it's not science, only science fiction. It may be science and/or philosophy one day.

I had the Jehovah's Witnesses round some time ago. Having seen them coming I thought, "you come to bend my ear with your religion, well you can listen to mine instead". That meant I had to come up with something quickly. It covered a time span from the big bang to the big crunch, and included the possible nature /origin of God. Pretty good going for a few minutes, and owed a large amount to a thread I have noticed running through A.C. Clarke's stories.

They never even got the chance to tell me who they were. I kept them for 45 mins, and they were reduced to saying the sun is shining and the flowers are beautiful.

Now we come to the awkward bit. I can't get my blasted idea out of my own head. I think I've partially converted myself.

Online Roger Parsons  
#13 Posted : 12 July 2019 07:15:16(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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I am reading an excellent book called "Factfulness" by Hans Rosling et al. Strapline: "Ten reasons why we are wrong about the world - and why things are better than you think."
It is a stunning attempt to put knowledge and analytical skills to the test and sharpen critical skills. I would recommend it to anyone of a meteorological inclination wishing to look at scientific, medical and social prediction. Especially if you enjoy a good debate. You will be surprised by what you don't know and hopefully by what you do!

A useful summary of some key points.
https://www.samuelthomasdavies.com/book-summaries/business/factfulness/



Roger

Edited by user 13 July 2019 07:22:30(UTC)  | Reason: + addition + bold

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Bertwhistle  
#14 Posted : 12 July 2019 16:54:48(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,499
Location: Central Southern England

Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall; amazing read. Changed my view of an awful lot- not because it presented facts I didn't now; it was the way in which it presented facts I did know. Made me think.

A must for politicians, geographers, and magi.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#15 Posted : 13 July 2019 07:20:36(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall; amazing read. Changed my view of an awful lot- not because it presented facts I didn't now; it was the way in which it presented facts I did know. Made me think.

A must for politicians, geographers, and magi.

With a forward from Sir John Scarlett no less, Bert! Thanks. I shall have a go at it.

I see that my recommendation, "Factfulness" is an "also bought" on Amazon!

Roger

 

Edited by user 13 July 2019 09:48:10(UTC)  | Reason: + bold

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Online Roger Parsons  
#16 Posted : 14 July 2019 06:48:37(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: agw2 Go to Quoted Post
Childhoods End, 2001 by Arthur C Clarke

What do you mean it's not science, only science fiction. It may be science and/or philosophy one day.

I had the Jehovah's Witnesses round some time ago. Having seen them coming I thought, "you come to bend my ear with your religion, well you can listen to mine instead". That meant I had to come up with something quickly. It covered a time span from the big bang to the big crunch, and included the possible nature /origin of God. Pretty good going for a few minutes, and owed a large amount to a thread I have noticed running through A.C. Clarke's stories.

They never even got the chance to tell me who they were. I kept them for 45 mins, and they were reduced to saying the sun is shining and the flowers are beautiful.

Now we come to the awkward bit. I can't get my blasted idea out of my own head. I think I've partially converted myself.

I had a JW lady call 2 years ago when we were extracting honey in the kitchen, agw. Local bees knew what we were doing and were hanging around the doors wanting to come in. I think JW women may be advised against going into houses alone - and she declined my invitation to get inside fast! They have not been back since. I wonder why.

I expect I shall be sent to Hell. Do they do that?

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

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