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Offline Roger Parsons  
#141 Posted : 20 September 2019 20:36:27(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Maunder Minimum Go to Quoted Post

 

We live in rural Worcestershire and during this current warm spell, the pigeons round here have been nest building once more. Whether they can actually raise a brood successfully this late in the year, is another matter.

 

I think they could MM. Unlike us, they only think of food and sex! As I said:

"The Woodpigeon breeding season is a long one, beginning as early as February in many urban and suburban areas and extending through to November or even December. "

R.

Edited by user 21 September 2019 04:37:41(UTC)  | Reason: additional.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Roger Parsons  
#142 Posted : 21 September 2019 04:34:18(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Excellent shots of Kingfishers - not to be missed!

'Angel-like' kingfisher shot at reserve is 'one in a million'

https://www.bbc.co.uk/ne...nottinghamshire-49742285

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#143 Posted : 21 September 2019 05:08:19(UTC)
Caz

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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post
Excellent shots of Kingfishers - not to be missed!
'Angel-like' kingfisher shot at reserve is 'one in a million'
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-49742285

Roger
 Lovely photo and shot not far from here.  We have Kingfishers on our local river and often catch a flash of blue when walking in the park. 

During the past few mornings, the first bird I’ve heard is a Wren that sits in our plum tree - a dawn soloist before the chorus.  I’m also hearing the Robin more often.  Perhaps they’re more noticeable due to the seasonal decline of other bird song.  

While I do like the Spring dawn chorus, it’s more a cacophonous and difficult to pick out individual birds.  At this time of year I can hear the songs more clearly and pick out the soloists.  It’s quite melodious!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Caz  
#144 Posted : 22 September 2019 09:00:12(UTC)
Caz

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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Wow!  A Heron just landed on our lawn not five metres away from me!  That was amazing!  

I’m sat out on our veranda with my coffee, heard wings flapping and looked up expecting to see a pigeon.  But instead saw a pair of long legs and a large body, the head and neck obscured by a vase of sweet peas on the handrail.  I shifted to get a full view, while trying to get my phone in camera mode and scared it off.  Perhaps just as well as it was looking at our pond!  

We have a lot of lakes close by and we’ve seen Herons sitting on roofs occasionally eyeing up garden ponds but usually during Spring when they’re feeding young.  I’ve never been so up close and personal before to such a prehistoric looking bird!  

Edited by user 22 September 2019 09:04:22(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Online Bertwhistle  
#145 Posted : 22 September 2019 12:47:31(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Caz Go to Quoted Post

Wow!  A Heron just landed on our lawn not five metres away from me!  That was amazing!  

I’m sat out on our veranda with my coffee, heard wings flapping and looked up expecting to see a pigeon.  But instead saw a pair of long legs and a large body, the head and neck obscured by a vase of sweet peas on the handrail.  I shifted to get a full view, while trying to get my phone in camera mode and scared it off.  Perhaps just as well as it was looking at our pond!  

We have a lot of lakes close by and we’ve seen Herons sitting on roofs occasionally eyeing up garden ponds but usually during Spring when they’re feeding young.  I’ve never been so up close and personal before to such a prehistoric looking bird!  

You've seen quite a bit from your veranda, Caz. I wonder if you're hard to spot, and if you're quietly having a drink, anything moving in won't have a clue you're there. I assume it's a roofed veranda? So you're hidden from anything looking down.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Caz  
#146 Posted : 22 September 2019 13:41:06(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,575
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

You've seen quite a bit from your veranda, Caz. I wonder if you're hard to spot, and if you're quietly having a drink, anything moving in won't have a clue you're there. I assume it's a roofed veranda? So you're hidden from anything looking down.

Yes, I am very lucky to have seen all kinds of creatures from here and some at very close range.  A stoat, hedgehogs, owls, bats, Sparrowhawks, Mallards in the pond and now a Heron right in front of me!  

It is roofed, it opens from the dining room, with conservatory on one side and cloakroom on the other, so only the front is open to the garden and I suppose it is more like a hide!  I rarely sit indoors and it’s my favourite quiet spot to relax with a cuppa and a ciggy.  

Hubby has spotted the Heron again on a neighbouring roof, so I’m wondering if maybe it’s injured. 

 

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Roger Parsons  
#147 Posted : 22 September 2019 13:41:52(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

You've seen quite a bit from your veranda, Caz. I wonder if you're hard to spot, and if you're quietly having a drink, anything moving in won't have a clue you're there. I assume it's a roofed veranda? So you're hidden from anything looking down.

Hello Bert. At our last home we had a similar experience to Caz. Our small garden pond attracted the attention of a grey heron, which landed on our roof to have a good look. It did not stay - no fish. They are quick learners - I know of a trout farm in West Wales where the herons learned to knock the automatic feeders and catch any trout which responded!

Many years ago we camped within a heronry in Ireland and were impressed by the racket the colony made at night. Worth doing once.

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#148 Posted : 22 September 2019 17:44:18(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 20,575
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Hello Bert. At our last home we had a similar experience to Caz. Our small garden pond attracted the attention of a grey heron, which landed on our roof to have a good look. It did not stay - no fish. They are quick learners - I know of a trout farm in West Wales where the herons learned to knock the automatic feeders and catch any trout which responded!

Many years ago we camped within a heronry in Ireland and were impressed by the racket the colony made at night. Worth doing once.

Roger

A few years ago, on a couple of Spring mornings a neighbour spotted a Heron eyeing up our pond, which does have quite a few goldfish in that have bred over the years.  Then a few days later, the fish all disappeared and there was an oily film on the pond.  I was gutted, thinking the Heron had been and eaten them all!

Then few days later, I spotted a goldfish, then another.  They’d obviously sought refuge in the deepest water under the plants but it took two or three weeks for them all to show themselves again.  This has happened again on a couple more occasions, but now I know the fish have been spooked into hiding. 

We’ve seen the Heron three times today, which is really unusual for so late in the year, as they generally just come when they’re feeding their young.  

I currently have a Robin sat atop my anemometer, singing his heart out. 

Edited by user 22 September 2019 17:46:36(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Offline Roger Parsons  
#149 Posted : 23 September 2019 13:07:19(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Location: Lincolnshire

Report today of a flock of over 40 Fieldfares flying over the Saltfleetby/Theddlethorpe Dunes NR.

See:

https://www.rspb.org.uk/...ides/bird-a-z/fieldfare/

This says: "Fieldfare begin to arrive from October and numbers build up as the winter progresses. Birds start to return in March and some may stay into May."

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline four  
#150 Posted : 24 September 2019 09:05:43(UTC)
four

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 07/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 20,221
Location: N.Y.Moors

The last family of swallows seem to have left, they had a brood of three in the workshop here and only started flying a week ago - but seemed surprisingly accomplished.
The earlier broods left about ten days ago.
It was interesting the first few days they attempted to crowd back into the nest at night, largely destroying it

Offline Roger Parsons  
#151 Posted : 24 September 2019 09:31:12(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Posts: 3,022
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post

The last family of swallows seem to have left, they had a brood of three in the workshop here and only started flying a week ago - but seemed surprisingly accomplished.
The earlier broods left about ten days ago.
It was interesting the first few days they attempted to crowd back into the nest at night, largely destroying it

I am very envious, four - we miss our "wash-house swallows" at our last home. We had them ringed by a mate every year and in 2015 one chick was netted and recorded in Norfolk on its way to Africa. Brilliant! Odds very much against that!

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Caz  
#152 Posted : 24 September 2019 18:08:48(UTC)
Caz

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Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
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Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Daniel has just come home from work and told me he scared the Heron off the pond this morning and there was an oily film on it.  I guessed it had been because there’s not a fish to be seen, but they will be hiding safely out of sight for a couple of weeks!  Heron’s learn quickly but so do fish!  

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

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Online Bertwhistle  
#153 Posted : 24 September 2019 18:50:30(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

Hello Bert. At our last home we had a similar experience to Caz. Our small garden pond attracted the attention of a grey heron, which landed on our roof to have a good look. It did not stay - no fish. They are quick learners - I know of a trout farm in West Wales where the herons learned to knock the automatic feeders and catch any trout which responded!

Many years ago we camped within a heronry in Ireland and were impressed by the racket the colony made at night. Worth doing once.

Roger

Saw a news article- wish I had the link- herons picking up bread at a village pond, thrown for ducks, and dropping it into the shallows then grabbing the fish that came for it.

 

Same film had a bunch of crows knowing when, in a traffic light sequence at crossroads, to drop nuts so that the car wheels opened them for them, and they avoided jeopardy from the traffic.

Come to think about it, it was probably a David programme, not the news.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline four  
#154 Posted : 29 September 2019 20:59:14(UTC)
four

Rank: Advanced Member

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Posts: 20,221
Location: N.Y.Moors

https://undark.org/artic...ay-subtlety-is-lost-too/

A more rational review of the North American bird decline survey - it points out that 15% of the decline was in non-native species such as starlings which have been deliberately targetted for conservation reasons as they adversely affect indigenous populations.

Furthermore, the start point used to compare was an unusual high point where farmland species had increased exponentially from a much lower base since new areas were brought into cultivation.

As usual with environmental doom stories the truth is the first casualty in the goal of headline grabbing.

Offline Chichesterweatherfan2  
#155 Posted : 29 September 2019 22:26:50(UTC)
Chichesterweatherfan2

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United Kingdom
Location: Chichester

Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post
https://undark.org/article/in-a-new-study-on-bird-loss-some-scientists-say-subtlety-is-lost-too/

A more rational review of the North American bird decline survey - it points out that 15% of the decline was in non-native species such as starlings which have been deliberately targetted for conservation reasons as they adversely affect indigenous populations.
Furthermore, the start point used to compare was an unusual high point where farmland species had increased exponentially from a much lower base since new areas were brought into cultivation.

As usual with environmental doom stories the truth is the first casualty in the goal of headline grabbing.

ah of course, yes the headline grabbing RSPB highlighting the catastrophic reduction in populations of Turtle Doves, Nightingales, Wood Warblers, Spotted Flycatchers... 

You don't half spout a pile of nonsense!

 

Online Gandalf The White  
#156 Posted : 29 September 2019 22:39:20(UTC)
Gandalf The White

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Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post
https://undark.org/article/in-a-new-study-on-bird-loss-some-scientists-say-subtlety-is-lost-too/

A more rational review of the North American bird decline survey - it points out that 15% of the decline was in non-native species such as starlings which have been deliberately targetted for conservation reasons as they adversely affect indigenous populations.
Furthermore, the start point used to compare was an unusual high point where farmland species had increased exponentially from a much lower base since new areas were brought into cultivation.

As usual with environmental doom stories the truth is the first casualty in the goal of headline grabbing.

A decline is still a decline, whatever mitigating factors you want to throw into the mix in an attempt to obfuscate.

The Undark piece is full of 'what if' and 'possibly' but of course it's the message you want to believe: classic bias confirmation.

Here's a piece from 2007 also finding significant population declines and citing climate change as one of the causes. I know you won't like that, given your complacent, wilfully ignorant stance on climate change.  

http://datazone.birdlife.org/sowb/casestudy/common-birds-are-declining-in-north-america

 

Someone certainly isn't good with facts, are they?

Location: South Cambridgeshire

130 metres ASL

52.0N 0.1E

Offline Devonian  
#157 Posted : 30 September 2019 06:43:53(UTC)
Devonian

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Location: East Dartmoor

Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post
https://undark.org/article/in-a-new-study-on-bird-loss-some-scientists-say-subtlety-is-lost-too/

A more rational review of the North American bird decline survey - it points out that 15% of the decline was in non-native species such as starlings which have been deliberately targetted for conservation reasons as they adversely affect indigenous populations.
Furthermore, the start point used to compare was an unusual high point where farmland species had increased exponentially from a much lower base since new areas were brought into cultivation.

As usual with environmental doom stories the truth is the first casualty in the goal of headline grabbing.

What is the truth then, wrt changes in population of North American birds?

You wont say, I can guarantee that, even in the most broad of brush ways.

Edited by user 30 September 2019 06:49:17(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

"When it takes nearly 900,000 votes to elect one party’s MP, and just 26,000 for another, you know something is deeply wrong."

The electoral reform society, 14,12,19

Offline Saint Snow  
#158 Posted : 30 September 2019 08:34:07(UTC)
Saint Snow

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Location: St Helens

On my commute, I drive through a rural area about a mile from my house, and often saw a buzzard sat on a telegraph pole, peering out/down. A right big bugger. Found myself looking out for it when I drove down that road. Hadn't seen it for a few months, but it was there the other evening so I'm glad it's still going strong. 

"Poverty exists not because we cannot feed the poor, but because we cannot satisfy the rich."

Martin

Home: St Helens (26m asl) Work: Manchester (75m asl)

A TWO addict since 14/12/01

Online ktaylor  
#159 Posted : 30 September 2019 10:55:43(UTC)
ktaylor

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Joined: 09/08/2019(UTC)
Posts: 979
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United Kingdom
Location: Ryarsh, kent

Where I live we get to see buzzards every day circling overhead. When it gets dark I can now hear an owl but can never find it. The other day out walking saw what I believe to be a hawk just hovering over a recently ploughed field. 

Come on you spurs

Save ryarsh stop the quarry

https://www.ryarshprotectiongroup.com

Online Bertwhistle  
#160 Posted : 30 September 2019 20:28:17(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 6,251
Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: ktaylor Go to Quoted Post

Where I live we get to see buzzards every day circling overhead. When it gets dark I can now hear an owl but can never find it. The other day out walking saw what I believe to be a hawk just hovering over a recently ploughed field. 

Possibly a kestrel, KT? Famed for hovering, although other raptors do.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

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