Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login. New Registrations are disabled.

Notification

Icon
Error

17 Pages«<1314151617>
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Offline Retron  
#281 Posted : 16 June 2019 05:34:37(UTC)
Retron

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 23,707
Location: Leysdown-on-Sea

Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

A friend of mine has a story (true, I think, not apocryphal) of a sheikh who bought a property in the UK and arranging for a lawn to be laid - which in due course it was, a perfect even green. But when he saw it, he was really unhappy and wanted to know where all the little white flowers were that he had been expecting to beautify the lawn!

Hah! Well, in my case it didn't even take a week - the daisies are back and it all looks rather nice, in my view.

What doesn't look so nice, though, is what the neighbours have done over the road. They live next to a bungalow (formerly owned by the husband's mum - she died of dementia, sadly). The bungalow had its front lawn ripped out ages ago, in favour of gravel, but it had an 8-ft high hedge on its boundary.

They've been struggling for the past year to sell the bungalow and it seems they've decided the hedge had to go. Brilliant - so instead of a tidy hedge, the new occupant will look out across to my pampas grass, viburnum (which has grown to around 12ft high) and roses. Obviously the hedge was to blame for a lack of sale, not the fact they've priced it at least £30K too high! (Heck, it's up for more than my 4-bed house is worth, and I've got more land).

This morning the dawn chorus was louder than normal. I've a feeling some of the birds that formerly perched across the road have moved over!

(Edited to increase the height of the hedge over the road, having checked on Streetview. It was pretty tall!)

 

 

Edited by user 16 June 2019 05:58:21(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline Caz  
#282 Posted : 19 June 2019 19:27:39(UTC)
Caz

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 28/10/2008(UTC)
Posts: 17,783
Woman
Location: Market Warsop, Nottinghamshire, East Midlands

Re the bees in our loft.  Hubby’s been re-tiling the shower in our en suite, which is beneath where we think the bees nest is and and he’s noticed quite a few bees have got into the ceiling down light and died.  It looks quite messy and hubby thinks new lights are needed.  I was ready for a change anyway. 

Market Warsop, North Nottinghamshire.

Join the fun of the monthly CET competition. Last chance to join in the yearly comp is 2nd March. Discuss monthly temperatures and records.

Offline Roger Parsons  
#283 Posted : 21 June 2019 10:44:30(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

It is "Solitary Bee Week" 1 - 7 July.
Why not get your loved one a "Bee Brick"?
Visit:
https://www.solitarybeeweek.com/

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Devonian  
#284 Posted : 26 June 2019 19:27:14(UTC)
Devonian

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 26,562
Man
Location: East Dartmoor

Not about decimation but I can't be bothered to start a new thread...

There must have been dozens of painted lady butterflies around the car park at work on Tuesday. A very stylish butterfly, with a fast flight. Clearly they wafted in on the S breeze, maybe overnight, the local bird reporting website only saw the first mentions on Tuesday as well which would help confirm the idea.

Anyone interested could keep an eye out, though perhaps with the wind more east of south than west, its possible many of them will be swept more towards Ireland and the Atlantic...Otoh, Butterfly Conservation have records of them all over the place.

"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"

Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016

"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"

Osborne, 22/12/18.

Offline NMA  
#285 Posted : 26 June 2019 19:52:13(UTC)
NMA

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 05/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 1,832
Man
Location: South Dorset

Will look out for them. Decimation if they end up in the middle of the Atlantic though...

The Hummingbird Moth seems to turn up most years here, Incredible insects.

 

Offline Roger Parsons  
#286 Posted : 26 June 2019 20:22:31(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Devonian Go to Quoted Post

Not about decimation but I can't be bothered to start a new thread...

There must have been dozens of painted lady butterflies around the car park at work on Tuesday. A very stylish butterfly, with a fast flight. Clearly they wafted in on the S breeze, maybe overnight, the local bird reporting website only saw the first mentions on Tuesday as well which would help confirm the idea.

Anyone interested could keep an eye out, though perhaps with the wind more east of south than west, its possible many of them will be swept more towards Ireland and the Atlantic...Otoh, Butterfly Conservation have records of them all over the place.

I posted the following on 16th, Dev - Insect Experts thread:

"I have just had a Lincolnshire report of 6+ Vagrant Emperor dragonfly sightings - has anyone else got lucky? [See above]

https://british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/vagrant-emperor/

Meanwhile we have had another delightful migrant in the garden today - a Painted Lady butterfly. Always good to see.
https://butterfly-conservation.org/butterflies/painted-lady"

There have been a lot about.


Roger

 

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Devonian  
#287 Posted : 26 June 2019 20:28:51(UTC)
Devonian

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 26,562
Man
Location: East Dartmoor

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

 

I posted the following on 16th, Dev - Insect Experts thread:

"I have just had a Lincolnshire report of 6+ Vagrant Emperor dragonfly sightings - has anyone else got lucky? [See above]

https://british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/vagrant-emperor/

Meanwhile we have had another delightful migrant in the garden today - a Painted Lady butterfly. Always good to see.
https://butterfly-conservation.org/butterflies/painted-lady"

There have been a lot about.


Roger

 

, sorry, I'm not keeping up! Yes, there do seem to be a lot about - which is splendid!

"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"

Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016

"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"

Osborne, 22/12/18.

Offline Roger Parsons  
#288 Posted : 26 June 2019 20:30:09(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Devonian Go to Quoted Post

 

, sorry, I'm not keeping up! Yes, there do seem to be a lot about - which is splendid!

Little bustards too, Dev!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-48770382

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Devonian  
#289 Posted : 26 June 2019 21:02:18(UTC)
Devonian

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 26,562
Man
Location: East Dartmoor

Originally Posted by: Roger Parsons Go to Quoted Post

Like most birds, it's in decline...

But, I do recall there is a project to introduce the bigger version to Salisbury Plain

"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"

Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016

"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"

Osborne, 22/12/18.

Offline Northern Sky  
#290 Posted : 02 July 2019 10:18:51(UTC)
Northern Sky

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 16/08/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,613
Location: Leeds W Yorks

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-48772448?fbclid=IwAR3F0v7cPK8bYw5FVCAXJ7H5XP_1Iv1V0rpEwvq5DPhtsnXS2JKT_j2P8OM

A little bit of positive news. It's a start but there is so much more that could and should be done. 

Cutting back roadside verges is something that has intensely annoyed me for years. I love the planting of wildflower meadows but I also think there are lots of areas that would just benefit from less frequent cutting back of things like nettles and thistles, which while not so attractive to look at, are crucial plants for insects.

Interesting quote from Franziska Schrodt - "From a scientific viewpoint, we now know much more about the importance of roadside vegetation for biodiversity and other critical services to humanity such as regulating pollution, maintaining soil structure and health, reducing flood risk... than even five years ago."

Offline Rob K  
#291 Posted : 02 July 2019 15:29:50(UTC)
Rob K

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 20,691
Location: Northeast Hampshire

In my area (Hart district in Hampshire) the council have marked out certain areas of roadside verges as "biodiversity" areas, and they are seeded with wildflowers and not mown, which is to be encouraged.

Less encouraging is that we have new next-door neighbours. The lady who has lived there for 40 years has moved down to Cornwall, and the new neighbours, while they seem perfectly nice, have basically removed all plant life from the back garden. The husband said to me "My wife hates flies and moths so we're getting rid of all the trees and shrubs"!

We have a fairly unkempt hedge along the boundary (well I say hedge, it's actually an ancient wooden fence entirely covered by a mixture of creeper, climbing roses, ivy, forsythia and goodness knows what else. Birds nest in it and there are always lots of bees around - the other day I noticed there is a bees' nest under a patch of moss in the lawn near the boundary. Every time I feel guilty about neglecting the garden I think about all the wildlife it provides a home for. Hopefully the desecration next door will not deter all this biodiversity!

Yateley, NE Hampshire, 73m asl.
Offline four  
#292 Posted : 03 July 2019 05:56:25(UTC)
four

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 07/04/2006(UTC)
Posts: 19,149
Location: N.Y.Moors

https://www.forbes.com/s...species-with-extinction/

German study suggest huge numbers of insects killed during the brief adult flying stage is having a significant effect.

Offline Devonian  
#293 Posted : 03 July 2019 21:37:26(UTC)
Devonian

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 26,562
Man
Location: East Dartmoor

Originally Posted by: four Go to Quoted Post
https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2019/06/26/why-climate-activists-threaten-endangered-species-with-extinction/
German study suggest huge numbers of insects killed during the brief adult flying stage is having a significant effect.

It's interesting how, when it suits you, you lap up the results of a model based upon a theory. The problem is in this case there is no data to put into his model and it is the first such study:

"The study aims at raising awareness about wind power generation being one of the possible causes of insect biomass lost in several nature reserve areas in Germany. The order of magnitude of insect losses caused by wind power generation has been quantified theoretically for the first time. Losses caused by insecticides, herbicides, monocultures, human transport, light contamination, climate change and urbanization have not been quantified yet. For this reason, it is impossible to say to what extent the different impacts are responsible for insect decline, or which impact is the most harmful one. In any case, all impacts on insect population probably add to each other."

"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"

Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016

"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"

Osborne, 22/12/18.

Offline agw2  
#294 Posted : 06 July 2019 22:11:35(UTC)
agw2

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 18/04/2010(UTC)
Posts: 22
Man

Originally Posted by: Lionel Hutz Go to Quoted Post

 

Something similar.

Nordenholt's Millions

Offline Bertwhistle  
#295 Posted : 07 July 2019 06:42:36(UTC)
Bertwhistle

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 20/11/2015(UTC)
Posts: 5,469
Location: Central Southern England

Something's gone wrong for the bees in our garden. We have built up a very wildlife-friendly garden over the years. I'm proud to say it's an oasis compared to the sterile lawns of neighbours. We don't spray anything but water.

But the bees seem to have a problem. We have found several unable to launch themselves into flight. One hopped about a cm up repeatedly but couldn't get airborne. Another seemed to spin round and round on its back. We have also found several dead and dying, despite warm weather and abundant nectar-rich flowers. Numbers have reduced massively since the spring, when we had hundreds. On our huge lavender, there was only one busily working the young blossoms yesterday.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Roger Parsons  
#296 Posted : 07 July 2019 07:07:44(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Something's gone wrong for the bees in our garden. We have built up a very wildlife-friendly garden over the years. I'm proud to say it's an oasis compared to the sterile lawns of neighbours. We don't spray anything but water.

But the bees seem to have a problem. We have found several unable to launch themselves into flight. One hopped about a cm up repeatedly but couldn't get airborne. Another seemed to spin round and round on its back. We have also found several dead and dying, despite warm weather and abundant nectar-rich flowers. Numbers have reduced massively since the spring, when we had hundreds. On our huge lavender, there was only one busily working the young blossoms yesterday.

Hello Bert - an intriguing question with several possible answers including bee diseases and plant toxicity. My comments have honey bees in mind, but some may apply to other bee species.

Acarine disease can produce the kind of symptoms you describe, and so can bee viruses transmitted by the Varroa mite.

http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?pageid=192

http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?pageid=275

However your bees may have been feeding on on a plant with toxic nectar. See information on plant toxicity at the end of this piece.

https://www.countryfile.com/wildlife/insects-invertebrates/bee-guide-how-to-identify-where-to-spot-and-how-to-attract-bees-to-your-garden/

Also see:

https://www.kew.org/read-and-watch/do-lime-trees-kill-bees

Hot dry spells soon affect bee thirst, and bee-friendly drinkers are worth a try - a shallow dish of water with a piece of wet sacking to land on might be appreciated. Keep topping it up. Rain water preferable.

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Devonian  
#297 Posted : 07 July 2019 08:05:41(UTC)
Devonian

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 02/05/2006(UTC)
Posts: 26,562
Man
Location: East Dartmoor

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

Something's gone wrong for the bees in our garden. We have built up a very wildlife-friendly garden over the years. I'm proud to say it's an oasis compared to the sterile lawns of neighbours. We don't spray anything but water.

But the bees seem to have a problem. We have found several unable to launch themselves into flight. One hopped about a cm up repeatedly but couldn't get airborne. Another seemed to spin round and round on its back. We have also found several dead and dying, despite warm weather and abundant nectar-rich flowers. Numbers have reduced massively since the spring, when we had hundreds. On our huge lavender, there was only one busily working the young blossoms yesterday.

Our wildflower meadow was full of dead, moribund, bumble bees* after the cold torrential rains of early June - there must have been thousand across the field so affected. Even after the rain stopped several days later, the BBs there lacked vigor. BB Numbers don't seem to have recovered, the lanes are quiet, the garden similar.

I wonder if some BB nests got flooded. Other possibilities do included those Roger mentions plus the general effect of decades of insecticide use and something major we can't talk about.

And what else has happened this year? Well, I remember reading more farmers have been given derogations to use powerful insecticides...

*its not clear if you mean BBs, HBs or just bees in general.

"In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way"

Nigel Farage, Daily Mirror, 16/5/2016

"I think the mistake the government made - led by Theresa May - from the start was to try and claim that a country that had voted 17 million to leave the EU, 16 million to stay, wanted a 100% Brexit"

Osborne, 22/12/18.

Offline Northern Sky  
#298 Posted : 07 July 2019 10:13:19(UTC)
Northern Sky

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 16/08/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,613
Location: Leeds W Yorks

Some of you may have heard of Prof Dave Goulson. Here's an article by him on pesticides and Brexit  - bit controversial maybe should leave it for the Brexit thread 

https://nurturing-nature.co.uk/bumblebees-and-their-ecology/will-the-uk-retain-the-neonicotinoid-moratorium-post-brexit-by-prof-dave-goulson/

"Like Brexit or not, it provides a golden opportunity, freeing British farming from the Common Agricultural Policy, and making it possible to steer it away from industrial, chemical farming towards more sustainable methods. If we do not, we will lose bees and much else of our wildlife for ever."

Offline Roger Parsons  
#299 Posted : 07 July 2019 11:03:52(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Devonian Go to Quoted Post

Our wildflower meadow was full of dead, moribund, bumble bees* after the cold torrential rains of early June - there must have been thousand across the field so affected. Even after the rain stopped several days later, the BBs there lacked vigor. BB Numbers don't seem to have recovered, the lanes are quiet, the garden similar.

I wonder if some BB nests got flooded. Other possibilities do included those Roger mentions plus the general effect of decades of insecticide use and something major we can't talk about.

And what else has happened this year? Well, I remember reading more farmers have been given derogations to use powerful insecticides...

*its not clear if you mean BBs, HBs or just bees in general.

Thanks Dev. You are quite right - I did not go into the pesticide angle as I think Bert will be up to speed on that possibility. You will have seen my caveat that Bert did not specify which bee species were involved, and therefore I was only speaking about honey bees.

Thinking now of bumblebees - they are different to honeybees in that they do not overwinter as a colony. Only the queens hibernate, the rest of the colony, workers and drones, dies off at the end of the season. When this happens varies, but in the case of the Tree Bumble bee it is perfectly possible to note signs of dying off at this time of year. It's a natural cycle. So we have the possibilities of:

  1. Natural colony die off.
  2. Impact of unknown agrochemicals. [Or local pest control measures/Pollution?]
  3. Natural Bee disease and parasites.
  4. Natural Toxic plant nectars.
  5. Natural Environmental factors, e.g. downpours, flooding, high or low nest temperatures, drought.
  6. To these I'll add Natural Predation, such as a badger digging up and destroying a colony, leaving stragglers to die.

As I said to Bert - it is an intriguing question and I hope folks find my suggested links, and the Prof Goulson link, of interest. You will notice I have added the word "natural" to many of these causes, as they are familiar issues and not specifically caused by human activity. The only one really worth getting knickers in a twist about is agrochemicals, the cause you highlight, and in particular misuse of agrochemicals. This could be a neighbour not reading instructions on a garden/household product through to a major landowner not using best practice in their spraying or a chemical accident.

All very interesting - thanks for the contribution.

Roger

Edited by user 07 July 2019 13:06:26(UTC)  | Reason: + addition

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline Roger Parsons  
#300 Posted : 07 July 2019 11:08:54(UTC)
Roger Parsons

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 23/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 779
Man
Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Northern Sky Go to Quoted Post

Some of you may have heard of Prof Dave Goulson. Here's an article by him on pesticides and Brexit  - bit controversial maybe should leave it for the Brexit thread 

https://nurturing-nature.co.uk/bumblebees-and-their-ecology/will-the-uk-retain-the-neonicotinoid-moratorium-post-brexit-by-prof-dave-goulson/

"Like Brexit or not, it provides a golden opportunity, freeing British farming from the Common Agricultural Policy, and making it possible to steer it away from industrial, chemical farming towards more sustainable methods. If we do not, we will lose bees and much else of our wildlife for ever."

A nice quotation, NS. Dave Goulson is a good chap.

It prompts me to ask you a question of my own - which I shall leave you and others to have a go at. No clues!

"How can it make biological sense for any plant to produce a nectar which is toxic to pollinators?"

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Users browsing this topic
17 Pages«<1314151617>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Code of conduct

TWO is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.