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Offline tevo  
#501 Posted : 04 April 2019 06:19:01(UTC)
tevo

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Location: cambridge

Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

 

Our neighbours are keen users of chicken poo. It doesn't half pong though. Minimal rain today as expected though might just get a light shower looking at the radar.

I just use the pelleted form so not much pong from it , just as well really because I've put down 40 kgs of the stuff and although we did get a bit of rain the other day but nowhere near enough so I must of looked a right pillock  when using the hose in between  the showers  

Online Bertwhistle  
#502 Posted : 07 April 2019 06:33:51(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Lionel Hutz Go to Quoted Post

 

Yes, probably a bit risky alright  Apparently, the traditional date for first planting here is St. Patrick's day. I really can't figure that one out though because we can expect sharpish frosts most years well into April and I'm in a reasonably mild location so mid March seems a silly time to plant. Still, I think that I'll chance it this year. I chitted my Red Duke of York a few weeks ago and they are just begging to be put in the ground at this stage. If we do get frost, I will try to cover them overnight in newspaper or something  I just have a feeling that this is a year that I might get away with it. 

Our earlies went in in March and they're up and looking strong; they've not been affected by the ground frosts we've had.

 

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Bertwhistle  
#503 Posted : 07 April 2019 06:35:08(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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On our woodland bank, the wood anemones are looking amazing interspersed with violets. The alkanet is also in full flower.

We bought some lovely cow parsley specimens from Hilliers yesterday- purple foliage. They'll complement the bluebells and red campions on the bank.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline DEW  
#504 Posted : 07 April 2019 09:06:51(UTC)
DEW

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Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

On our woodland bank, the wood anemones are looking amazing interspersed with violets. The alkanet is also in full flower.

We bought some lovely cow parsley specimens from Hilliers yesterday- purple foliage. They'll complement the bluebells and red campions on the bank.

Watch out for cow parsley! I let a few (wild) specimens grow on in my previous garden and suddenly it was everywhere.

It was most foule weather ... and so we went into an alehouse - Samuel Pepys
Online Bertwhistle  
#505 Posted : 07 April 2019 12:38:02(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Originally Posted by: DEW Go to Quoted Post

 

Watch out for cow parsley! I let a few (wild) specimens grow on in my previous garden and suddenly it was everywhere.

Exactly as we want it Dew; that zone in our garden is a twenty-year experiment in human humility!

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline tevo  
#506 Posted : 15 April 2019 07:15:06(UTC)
tevo

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Location: cambridge

I'm off to Dominican republic this week so as my Musa banana plant is now starting to grow through its over wintering protection I'm going to take a chance that the sharp frosts have gone here and unveil it today  

User is suspended until 31/01/2293 12:26:49(UTC) Gray-Wolf  
#507 Posted : 15 April 2019 20:13:02(UTC)
Gray-Wolf

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This has been such a dry week or so ( considering we nearly flooded again just before!) so I'm already needing to water the containers esp. the shrubs.

Doesn't look like the rain I expected tomorrow will amount to much either!

Some summer bulbs and a few Clematis to put in but this wind can give over before I do!!!

Koyaanisqatsi

ko.yaa.nis.katsi (from the Hopi language), n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living.

VIRESCIT VULNERE VIRTUS

Offline Lionel Hutz  
#508 Posted : 16 April 2019 09:35:51(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

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Ireland

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

 

Our earlies went in in March and they're up and looking strong; they've not been affected by the ground frosts we've had.

 

Mine seem to have escaped the frosts too. I covered them on one or two of the nights but in the end the temperatures stayed just a fraction above zero.

In the meantime, I have a question that I hope you or someone else might be able to help me with! I chitted my earlies(Red Duke of York) and second earlies(British Queens - ironically a very popular variety in Ireland). A few of them have one or two very long leading shoots. They're not spindly but the leaf section is way above the ground so there are long shoots up to six inches high before they have leaves. Will these do well or should I simply start from scratch?

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

Online Bertwhistle  
#509 Posted : 16 April 2019 15:19:07(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Location: Central Southern England

Originally Posted by: Lionel Hutz Go to Quoted Post

 

Mine seem to have escaped the frosts too. I covered them on one or two of the nights but in the end the temperatures stayed just a fraction above zero.

In the meantime, I have a question that I hope you or someone else might be able to help me with! I chitted my earlies(Red Duke of York) and second earlies(British Queens - ironically a very popular variety in Ireland). A few of them have one or two very long leading shoots. They're not spindly but the leaf section is way above the ground so there are long shoots up to six inches high before they have leaves. Will these do well or should I simply start from scratch?

I'm not a potato expert Lionel- but have you thought about Potato Witches Bloom or Broom (can't remember which) which is a disease born by insects, including leaf-hoppers? Are the leaves yellowing at all?

Alternatively maybe the length of the chitted shoots had an effect? I'll be honest, I just go for it with potatoes after the initial planting instructions but I have grown them in high-sided bags and beds at times which makes them shoot quickly upwards, leaving weak stems. But then, your stems are not spindly. Hmmm.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Offline Lionel Hutz  
#510 Posted : 17 April 2019 06:16:48(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

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Ireland

Originally Posted by: Bertwhistle Go to Quoted Post

 

I'm not a potato expert Lionel- but have you thought about Potato Witches Bloom or Broom (can't remember which) which is a disease born by insects, including leaf-hoppers? Are the leaves yellowing at all?

Alternatively maybe the length of the chitted shoots had an effect? I'll be honest, I just go for it with potatoes after the initial planting instructions but I have grown them in high-sided bags and beds at times which makes them shoot quickly upwards, leaving weak stems. But then, your stems are not spindly. Hmmm.

The leaves aren't yellowing, it's simply that the growth pattern is different to the norm. Each plant has one high shoot with just a couple of smallish leaves at the top. Usually, I would see several shoots with wide leaves developing near the base. I will just have to see what happens I suppose.

I managed to get my hands on a couple of specimens of an unusual variety this year. A company from Co. Antrim is selling Lumper potatoes. This is an unusual variety these days. However, it was the staple variety in Ireland during the nineteenth century and was the variety which failed during the Great Famine in the 1840's. A taste of history. Hopefully, it will avoid the potato blight! 

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

Offline Ulric  
#511 Posted : 17 April 2019 07:21:01(UTC)
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The notable feature of our tiny garden this year is how dry it is.

I'm quite worried about how some of the plants are doing because they look drought stressed to me. I don't like using a hose on the garden other than in the high summer.

"Truly if you had the brains to deliver Brexit you wouldn’t…."

Anon - Twitter

Online Roger Parsons  
#512 Posted : 17 April 2019 07:33:01(UTC)
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Location: Lincolnshire

Originally Posted by: Ulric Go to Quoted Post

The notable feature of our tiny garden this year is how dry it is.

I'm quite worried about how some of the plants are doing because they look drought stressed to me. I don't like using a hose on the garden other than in the high summer.

It has slowed down the growth of our lawn, but I do keep wondering what happened to "April showers", Ulric. Dry as a bone here.

Roger

p.s. Mowed the lawn Wednesday but estimate 1/3 the usual biomass of clippings.

Edited by user 17 April 2019 19:01:40(UTC)  | Reason: Added p.s.

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline NMA  
#513 Posted : 17 April 2019 07:46:31(UTC)
NMA

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Location: South Dorset

Originally Posted by: Lionel Hutz Go to Quoted Post

The leaves aren't yellowing, it's simply that the growth pattern is different to the norm. Each plant has one high shoot with just a couple of smallish leaves at the top. Usually, I would see several shoots with wide leaves developing near the base. I will just have to see what happens I suppose. 

No idea what might cause this Lionel.

I managed to get my hands on a couple of specimens of an unusual variety this year. A company from Co. Antrim is selling Lumper potatoes. This is an unusual variety these days. However, it was the staple variety in Ireland during the nineteenth century and was the variety which failed during the Great Famine in the 1840's. A taste of history. Hopefully, it will avoid the potato blight! 

A variety I've never heard of though I must have read about it when reading about the Famine. 

Reminded me of when our daughter had to draw some potatoes at primary school. She coloured them pink, yellow and purple which of course are potato varieties I had taught her about. The teacher was having none of it and insisted potatoes only come in white! 

It is dry here too with a little drizzle yesterday. Very much an an oak out before the ash scenario like last year and very noticeable.

The plus side was I was able to get to Sutton Bingham yesterday and saw the water levels there are brim full which is good news for the people of Yeovil. Though the Frome is running ok but gravel shoals are appearing in places.

I have been watering outdoor pots since late March.

Nick

User is suspended until 31/01/2293 12:26:49(UTC) Gray-Wolf  
#514 Posted : 17 April 2019 09:43:53(UTC)
Gray-Wolf

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Location: Mytholmroyd

My Buddleia is dropping even after a couple of cans of water on it?

Hope its not related to the flood works and our water table locally ......

Some Gladioli to go out today and 3 little Clematis to fill in some gaps along the Fenceline.

Lovely day for it! 

Koyaanisqatsi

ko.yaa.nis.katsi (from the Hopi language), n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living.

VIRESCIT VULNERE VIRTUS

Offline ARTzeman  
#515 Posted : 17 April 2019 10:08:18(UTC)
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Location: Peasedown St John. N.E. Sommerset

6 hybrid Fuscia in pots and flowering. Just waiting to go in a basket. Geranium has buds but will stay in the growing room until the warmth is steady. Herbs are okay.

Some people walk in the rain.

Others just get wet.

Offline Lionel Hutz  
#516 Posted : 17 April 2019 12:42:39(UTC)
Lionel Hutz

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Ireland

Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

 

A variety I've never heard of though I must have read about it when reading about the Famine. 

Reminded me of when our daughter had to draw some potatoes at primary school. She coloured them pink, yellow and purple which of course are potato varieties I had taught her about. The teacher was having none of it and insisted potatoes only come in white! 

It is dry here too with a little drizzle yesterday. Very much an an oak out before the ash scenario like last year and very noticeable.

The plus side was I was able to get to Sutton Bingham yesterday and saw the water levels there are brim full which is good news for the people of Yeovil. Though the Frome is running ok but gravel shoals are appearing in places.

I have been watering outdoor pots since late March.

Nick

It's not really grown any more and hasn't been for a long time. It's just that one company decided to revive it http://www.goapotatoes.co.uk/meet-the-lumper/

I see that they haven't quite gone for the original variety, mind and have gone for something more suited to modern palates apparently.

 

Lionel Hutz

Nr.Waterford , S E Ireland

68m ASL

Online Bertwhistle  
#517 Posted : 27 April 2019 07:06:32(UTC)
Bertwhistle

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Location: Central Southern England

Oh dear; some of my young sweetcorns might have taken a bit of a windy hit! Best check the runners too - they've only just started to wind around their canes for support.

Bertie, Itchen Valley.

Remember Finlake!

Online Roger Parsons  
#518 Posted : 01 May 2019 05:05:05(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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We put the "sunbubble" up yesterday and the tomatoes are acclimatising in it.

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

Offline NMA  
#519 Posted : 01 May 2019 08:21:50(UTC)
NMA

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Location: South Dorset

It will be interesting to see how the forecast cold snap affects our gardens. Garden centres love it when people plant out tender stuff and then have to replace it a few weeks later. Ne'er cast a clout till May be out as the proverb says.

The lack of rain is interesting especially after the weekend gales dried the soil surface even more.

Maybe a change to growing weather next week? Or not.

 

Online Roger Parsons  
#520 Posted : 01 May 2019 10:01:42(UTC)
Roger Parsons

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Originally Posted by: NMA Go to Quoted Post

It will be interesting to see how the forecast cold snap affects our gardens. Garden centres love it when people plant out tender stuff and then have to replace it a few weeks later. Ne'er cast a clout till May be out as the proverb says.

You are right, NMA - but hopefully we shall get away with it!

Roger

RogerP

West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire

No county (Lincolnshire) has better churches and worse houses. The poorer sort of people wash their clothes with hog's dung, and burn dried cow's dung for want of better fuel; whence comes the Lincolnshire proverb: "Where the hogs shite soap and the cows shite fire".

Curiosities of Great Britain (c.1780)

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